Ormesby Hall – March 2019 -Part 2

PART 1 HISTORY HERE

This week we are going to have a wander around the house. Sophie and I thought it was a bit like a tardis, as it seemed to have far more rooms than the outside appearance would have you think.

You can see examples of  bold Palladian plasterwork and the more delicate neo-classical plasterwork ceilings in the drawing and dining rooms.

Firstly the padded doorway.  This was installed by James Stovin Pennyman (1830-96) to help prevent the sounds of conversation disturbing the household  – he worked in York Lunatic Asylum so it’s possibly where he got that idea from.

Lt-Colonel Alfred Worsley Pennyman KOSB (1883-1914) by Frank Watson Wood (Berwick-upon-Tweed 1862 – Strathyre 1953)

Sir James Pennyman Bt (1736 – 1808) by Sir Joshua Reynolds PRA (Plympton 1723 – London 1792)

drawing room

Lots of ceramics on display in the dining room

and a nice view of one of the formal gardens

upstairs is also quite ornate with the plasterwork everywhere

and every bedroom has a four poster

Loved this corner cupboard from the Netherlands circa 1770 – 1800

More art on the walls

 

Still Life with a Parrot, Fruit and Dead Birds  by Jakob Bogdani (Eperjes (now Presov), Hungary c.1660 – Finchley 1724) 

because who wouldn’t want a parrot and dead birds on the wall??

Beatrix Jane Frances Walker was born on 23 December 1873.1 She was the daughter of Sir James Robert Walker, 2nd Bt. and Louisa Susan Marlborough Heron-Maxwell.2 She married Reverend William Geoffrey Pennyman on 18 February 1901. She died on 17 July 1959 at age 85.1 From 18 February 1901, her married name became Pennyman.

Sir Thomas Pennyman, 2nd Bt (1642 – 1708) Sir Peter Lely (Soest 1618 – London 1680)

Ruth Pennyman lived here and in this room, till her end.

and clearly liked her nylon stockings

Them wer’t days.

Enough for this week, and I’ll be back next Thursday with a bit more from the hall.

Stay tooned 🙂

France May 2019 The Watermill part 3

For our final visit to the watermill, I’ll show you some of the interesting things I found walking around the grounds with my camera.

In one of the sheds

A roller in the shed!

 

Yes that was a surprise, here’s a few details of it

There was another one in a lock up, but that still worked apparently. Had a bar in it too!

Garden Feature 😀

Bandsaw Beehive

Tractor No.1

Tractor No.2

Cartwheel

The waterwheels.

Trough

My favourite part was the Water feature.

Water Feature

So that brings me to the end of showing you around the watermill, though if you were interested there’s plenty more to see in the full album (including rusty stuff embedded in ivy and cat pictures) in the full album HERE

All pictures embiggenable with a clickety click.

Oh and finally, it was quite cold in the evenings, and Phil had to pull out his boy scout skills!

Fireman Phil! 🙂

Newcastle Guild Hall, and Quayside ~ December 2017

On my last post, The Camel Parade, I said that that was the last report for a while as I’ve posted everything for my outings in 2017. Well I lied. 🙂 Not so much lied really, as completely overlooked mine and Sophies day out to see the Guildhall in Newcastle.  Usually you are not allowed in the building, but there are Heritage Open days where you can get a guided tour of it, and Sophie booked us to go on one.

The History Bit

The building was designed by Robert Trollope and completed in 1655. Trollope was a 17th-century English architect, born in Yorkshire, who worked mainly in Northumberland and Durham. A propos of nothing, he was buried in St Mary’s church Gateshead where he’d designed and built his own monument with statue of himself and inscription that reads
“Here lies Robert Trollop

Who made yon stones roll up

When death took his soul up

His body filled this hole up”.

More Pam Ayres than Wordsworth, but he lives on in his magnificent buildings.

The frontage of the building was rebuilt to designs by William Newton and David Stephenson in 1794. The east end of the building is an extension designed by John Dobson and completed in 1823.

So on with the pictures!

In the stairwell on the way up to the courtrooms

Charles II in Roman Army Gear, who knows why!  His feet look really big to me!

The statue was placed originally placed at the North End of the Tyne Bridge, on the restoration of Charles II to the throne.  It had the motto Adventus Regis solemn gregis. i.e the coming of the king is the comfort of his people.On 15th June 1771 it was moved and placed in a niche on the side of the Exchange (this is what the Guildhall was known as back then).  It was finally moved to where it is now in 1794.  I got this information from a book published in 1826 by John Sykes (bookseller of Newcastle), and the full fascinating story can be found HERE 

The courtroom

In 1649 15 people were hanged on the Town Moor for the crime of Witchcraft, they were tried here.

Mind your head!

The Merchant Adventurers Hall was quite something..

John 21:6 🙂

Ceiling detail

All the mayors coats of arms, from then until now.

Fake fire!

 

Had me fooled! 🙂

 

Stay tooned for part 2, which will be even more stunning than part 1, really! 😀

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Jarrow Hall, Anglo Saxon village ~ Part 2

Part 1 HERE

After the museum we went out to the anglo~saxon farm and village. Home to curly-coated pigs, Dexter bullocks, sheep, goats, ducks, chickens and more, this 11-acre site houses rare breeds which are the closest possible representatives of the animals that would have been present 1300 years ago. Generally smaller than those we see today, these breeds give a feel for what animals would have been like during Bede’s time. Anglo-Saxons used the bird species for their meat, feathers and eggs; the eggs were not only eaten but used to mix inks used by monks to illustrate their manuscripts. Cattle would have worked daily on farms to pull ploughs or carts, while sheep were kept mainly for their wool which was spun and woven into cloth.  The farm is complemented by a number of replica wattle and daub and timber-framed buildings based on structures excavated within Anglo-Saxon Northumbria, and is a green haven in the middle of Jarrow.

We picked a good day for the weather.

curly coated pig having a snooze

 

ducking about

 

horn-a-plenty

 

Mr & Mrs Gander

 

at the bottom end of the site you can see across the River Tyne

Bi yellow thingy being brought up river

 

We then got round to the village bit where there’s a replica Anglo-Saxon cross, carved entirely by hand, and sits overlooking the River Tyne.

It sits above the village meeting place

and you get a good view over the village

There was a chap called Jim inside the building on the right of the above picture, and he was really informative, and let Sophie have a go at grinding flour

he’d also made a weaving thingy and was in the process of weaving some cloth

he’d also made a wood turner

for making utensils

This next building is a huge larder, you go down steps once you’re through the door and there’s sausages and herbs etc all hanging from the ceiling, but it it was really cold and dark in there!

All the fences around the farm were hand made willow woven

We left as the sun was sinking and we wanted to get across to the site of the monastery which is just down the road by the church, but that will be our next report, so stay tooned!

 

 

 

Pow Hill Nature Reserve ~ Sept 2017~ part 2

Part 1 HERE

We had to walk back the same way we came, so I decided to put the macro lens on and see what I could find,

forget-me-nots

but soon changed back to the telephoto, the water was too enticing, and other stuff was going on,

Caught in The Act 

the sheep were off to get a drink

The Great Escape

 

Red & Ginger

 

When we got back we trogged up the hill to the newly opened cafe

delicious home made soup for lunch

and a lovely view over Derwent Water

The little cabin is for hire, the people who run the cafe also run a Glamping site which has got great reviews on their facebook page, hot tubs, clear ceilings for star watching etc. Their website is HERE and you can see the different cabins and book a stay if you so desire.

after lunch Sophie and I decided to explore the woodlands behind the cafe

time to revisit the macro lens

Mellow Yellow

 

Liking the Lichen

 

Not mushroom left

 

and admire the views of the heather covered meadows

before making our way back to the car.

Extra lusciousness can be seen in the full album HERE

Stay tooned for our next outing, to Jarrow Hall, the Bede Museum and Medieval Village

 

 

St. Andrews Church, Bolam ~ September 2017

Last week I posted about mine and Sophie’s trip to Bolam Lake, and for regular followers you’ll know that in the afternoon the clouds came over and we decided to visit St.Andrews Church, which is only around the corner and a minute or so away from the lake. In spite of that, and in spite of having been there before, I managed to not find it and got lost for 1/2 an hour. I’m blaming the sat-nav for confusing me!  Anyway eventually we got there and took a few pictures.

The church is ancient, a grade I listed building, and has been there for 1000 years. 

The tower was built at that time, by the Saxons, with a belfry at the top. The main belfry window opening has a classic Saxon rounded shaft in the middle, said to be made by applying wood turning techniques.

The porch’s round arched doorway has 13th century dogtooth carving around it and reaching all the way down to the ground . The pattern at its best is usually shaped like four flower petals. The outermost nutmeg carving is more a 12th century style. Above it in the church wall is a reused gravestone.

The Chancel

The chancel is typically long and narrow, with an east window of three lancets, which were glazed in about 1880 by F.R. Wilson. The original Saxon chancel was lengthened in the 13th century by the Normans and parts of the former sanctuary arch can be seen, reused. The beautiful altar frontal was donated in 1909 by Augusta in memory of her brother Charles Perkins who died at 2am on25th August 1905.

The South Aisle and at the end the Shortflatt Chapel.

 

The chapel, currently referred to as the Shortflatt Chapel or sometimes Dent chapel, is now so named because it was built by Robert de Reymes, who had inherited half the barony of Bolam. He was a knight and lived at Shortflatt, as did his descendants for the following three hundred years. Shortflatt eventually passed to the Dent and now the Hedley-Dent family.

Robert rebuilt Shortflatt Tower in stone with a licence to crenellate in 1305, after it had been burnt down. The town of Bolam was granted a market and a fair the same year, but Bolam castle was described as dilapidated. He died in 1324 and there is an effigy of him (without legs) in the chapel. It is thought the effigy was shortened to fit in the niche, which originally almost certainly would have contained a statue of The Virgin Mary.

On April 30th 1942, a German bomber  was on a bombing run over England when he was chased by 2 RAF fighters, in trying to get away he offloaded his bombs and flew low. He didn’t make it, but one of his bombs flew into the chancel. On 5th May the vicar’s wife, wrote to her son Flying Officer John Hutton stationed in the Middle East:
‘…Jerry paid us a visit at 4am May 1st. He was being hotly pursued by two of our fighters who were on his tail. He was very low down, and discharged the whole of his load in order to get away, but he failed and lies at Longhorsley. 4 bombs 2 1/2 tons in all. One fell, just missing the walnut tree, which still stands, 30yds from houses wall. An unexploded one lay in the chancel, it had passed through the lower part of the wall in the H>D> Chapel, smashing all the furnishings in that part of the church, none of any value, injuring some windows…the remaining two bombs only made large craters in Windmill field…’.

The churchyard has no less than 16 listed monuments, including the gate, but mostly ancient graves.

The oldest legible inscription on a headstone is dated 1697 and reads:
Hic jacet corpus Marci Ansley de Gallow-hill. Obiit II de Aprilis anno etatis……: salutis humanae 1697.

I think most photographers like a good graveyard to explore, and St.Andrews is one of the most interesting. And old!

Well that’s enough for a post I think. For more of the medieval stonework, mushrooms and ancient graves, the full album can be seen HERE

For more interesting info on the church, the website is HERE

Stay tooned 🙂

 

 

 

Fraggle Report~ Bolam Lake~September 2017

Now the Road Trip is done, I can go back to reporting on the lovely scenery that Sophie and I got to see on our day trips this year.  Back in September, just before Autumn turned up, we had a sunny day and headed off to Bolam Lake. Although I’ve been before a few years ago, Sophie hadn’t so off we went.

Warning: short attention span~ners leave now, long post with lots of pretty photo’s 🙂

The lake was constructed c.1817 for Lord Decies of Bolam. John Dobson was commissioned to lay out the grounds in 1816, including the 25-acre artificial lake and woodland. Northumberland County Council purchased the lake and some of the surounding woodland in 1972 for use as a Country Park.

 

Mute swans are a familiar and impressive sight in Britain. Often found on ponds and rivers in parks and other urban areas. By tradition, all mute swans belong to the monarch. They are one of Britain’s largest and heaviest birds, with a wingspan of up to 2.4 metres. Male swans are highly territorial and first threaten intruders, striking an aggressive pose with wings arched over their back, before charging at them to chase them off. There are quite a few that live on Bolam lake and they are magnificent.

not just swans though

You could see Autumn beginning to take over the greenery

with plenty of leaves fallen already

 

We heard a loud annoying buzzing sound at one point, and thought some one must be strimming but that wasn’t the case.

if I’d had a gun I’d have shot it down. Hadn’t realised how loud and obnoxious they are, especially on a peaceful walk around a beautiful place. In spite of that feeling I had a chat on with the chap driving it and saw the results on his iPad. I want one, but with a silencer!

There was plenty of opportunity to shoot some reflections

and places to sit and enjoy the views

Some amazing old trees and bushes

There’s a nice cafe at the visitor centre where we had lunch, but then came clouds, so we decided to visit the nearby very old church of St. Andrews, but that’s a tale for another day. Stay tooned!

Congratulations, you got to the end!

full album of photographs can be found HERE

Information on the location can be found in the menu where it says Map of Photography Locations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Road Trip October 2017 ~ The Model Show

After our visit to Overloon, we then headed for Veldhoven and got to the big conference centre where it’s held, and also where we stayed.  It’s an absolutely huge place with 500 rooms, mostly filled with geeky modellers 🙂 for the weekend. We’ve been here a couple of years ago so I’ve already photographed it inside and out, but it’s always fun to shoot the corridors!

Phil had been asked to judge one of the sections of the model competition, along with a couple of other modellers.  The competition has over 2000 entries, this whole show is vast.  I took a lot of photo’s but didn’t get all 2000!  I’m posting a few of my favourites here but I’ll leave a link to the full album, there’s some great artistry  to be seen.

the quality of the flat figures was also amazing,

Full album of models HERE

The long corridors of the conference are home to various artists whose work is for sale, and thinking of my pal Clare over at Monster Mermaid 

I photographed some of the art work on display

you can see more Here

We had a great time at the show, met up with old pals in the bar in the evenings to have a good chat on,  and on the Monday morning, packed our bags and came home. Phil’s already booked us back in for next year, so there’ll be another road trip next October!

Stay tooned 🙂

 

 

Road Trip ~ October 2017~ Day 5~Overloon

War belongs in the museum. That is the motto of the War Museum Overloon. The War Museum Overloon presents the history of the Second World War. Here you see how it can be that in five years’ time more than fifty million people lost their lives, but also how the oppressed people resourcefully coped with restrictions and shortages. There is attention to the opposition, but also to the persecution. Finally, there is, of course, also attention paid to the liberation, with special attention to the Battle of Overloon.

In September 1944, the British general Montgomery conceived of the attack plan Market Garden. With air landings at Arnhem and the liberation of a narrow corridor through South Netherlands, it would be possible for the Allies to make a further advance to Berlin. However, the plan only partially succeeded. The Allied forces wanted to broaden and strengthen their corridor, but the German opponent in turn tried to cut the Allies off. On 30 September, the two parties clashed in the vicinity of Overloon. German Panther tanks and American Sherman tanks attacked each other continuously. About a week later, British troops got involved in the fight. Ultimately, it took nearly three weeks before Overloon and more the southerly Venray were liberated. The Battle of Overloon is known as the most intense tank battle that ever took place on Dutch ground.
The battle of Overloon ensued as the Allies in Operation Aintree advanced from nearby positions south toward the village of Overloon. After a failed attack on Overloon by the U.S. 7th Armored Division, the British 3rd Infantry Division and the British 11th Armoured Division took over. The U.S. 7th Armored Division was moved south of Overloon to the Deurne – Weert area. Here they were attached to the British Second Army, and ordered to make demonstration attacks to the east in order to divert enemy forces from the Overloon and Venlo areas.

Suffering heavy losses the British captured Overloon and moved towards Venray. The advance on Venray resulted in heavy losses, especially around the Loobeek creek, which was swollen due to heavy autumn rains and was flooded and mined by the Germans. Casualties were heavy here among the 1st Battalion, Royal Norfolk Regiment which was serving in 185th Infantry Brigade of the British 3rd Division. During the battle, the village of Overloon was destroyed. In and around Overloon, some 2,500 soldiers died, making it one of the bloodiest battles in the Netherlands during the Second World War. Dozens of tanks, mainly American, were destroyed. (info from wiki and the museum website).

I did say in my post from Waterloo, that the underground museum there was one of the most impressive I’d seen, but really Overloon War museum was even more so.  The museum was established straight away after the war, in 1946 and  consists of tanks, vehicles and all sorts that were left on the battlefield, and have been restored. The place is huge, big enough to house a B25 tactical bomber as well as all the vehicles.

I was chuffed to see a spitfire too

Phil was happy to see a Panther G (he’s built a few himself 🙂 )

there were guns

and motorbikes

One of the more poignant exhibits was a Churchill tank and with it a letter from the chap who’d been in it when it was blown up, you can click on the picture of the letter to see it large so to speak, and to do so and read it is an experience in itself.

I also liked how they had old war posters and photographs to go with the displays

The Red Ball Express was a famed truck convoy system that supplied Allied forces moving quickly through Europe after breaking out from the D-Day beaches in Normandy in 1944. In order to expedite cargo to the front, trucks emblazoned with red balls followed a similarly marked route that had been closed to civilian traffic. These trucks were also given priority on regular roads.  The system originated in an urgent 36-hour meeting and began operating on August 25, 1944, staffed primarily with African-American soldiers. At its peak, the Express operated 5,958 vehicles, and carried about 12,500 tons of supplies a day. It ran for 83 days until November 16, when the port facilities at Antwerp, Belgium, were opened, enough French rail lines were repaired, and portable gasoline pipelines were deployed.

As well as all the vehicles, there is the history of the awful conditions that the people of Overloon suffered, and the role of the resistance.

outside there are statues (can’t find any info on them, but I think they depict the starvation of the townspeople)

this next one is Shock Troops of the Command/Limburg Regiment during the Second World War. Monument Shock Troops Command, manufactured by the painter/sculptor Charles Eyck.

they’d even restored a Bailey Bridge

ahem 🙂

Far too many photo’s for one post and I won’t bore you to death with lots of military vehicles, but I did take a shed load of them and for anyone interested

the full album can be viewed HERE

It is such a powerful museum to experience, and once isn’t really enough, there are bits that make you cry, like the letter from the tank guy, but there’s just so much that is fascinating, and you get such a sense of the scale of things.

This was the last visit to museums along the way to the Model show in Veldhoeven, but stay tooned, as well be getting to that next time.

 

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