Ormesby Hall – March 2019 -Part 2

PART 1 HISTORY HERE

This week we are going to have a wander around the house. Sophie and I thought it was a bit like a tardis, as it seemed to have far more rooms than the outside appearance would have you think.

You can see examples of  bold Palladian plasterwork and the more delicate neo-classical plasterwork ceilings in the drawing and dining rooms.

Firstly the padded doorway.  This was installed by James Stovin Pennyman (1830-96) to help prevent the sounds of conversation disturbing the household  – he worked in York Lunatic Asylum so it’s possibly where he got that idea from.

Lt-Colonel Alfred Worsley Pennyman KOSB (1883-1914) by Frank Watson Wood (Berwick-upon-Tweed 1862 – Strathyre 1953)
Sir James Pennyman Bt (1736 – 1808) by Sir Joshua Reynolds PRA (Plympton 1723 – London 1792)
drawing room

Lots of ceramics on display in the dining room

and a nice view of one of the formal gardens

upstairs is also quite ornate with the plasterwork everywhere

and every bedroom has a four poster

Loved this corner cupboard from the Netherlands circa 1770 – 1800

More art on the walls

 

Still Life with a Parrot, Fruit and Dead Birds  by Jakob Bogdani (Eperjes (now Presov), Hungary c.1660 – Finchley 1724) 

because who wouldn’t want a parrot and dead birds on the wall??

Beatrix Jane Frances Walker was born on 23 December 1873.1 She was the daughter of Sir James Robert Walker, 2nd Bt. and Louisa Susan Marlborough Heron-Maxwell.2 She married Reverend William Geoffrey Pennyman on 18 February 1901. She died on 17 July 1959 at age 85.1 From 18 February 1901, her married name became Pennyman.
Sir Thomas Pennyman, 2nd Bt (1642 – 1708) Sir Peter Lely (Soest 1618 – London 1680)

Ruth Pennyman lived here and in this room, till her end.

and clearly liked her nylon stockings

Them wer’t days.

Enough for this week, and I’ll be back next Thursday with a bit more from the hall.

Stay tooned 🙂

France May 2019 The Watermill part 3

For our final visit to the watermill, I’ll show you some of the interesting things I found walking around the grounds with my camera.

In one of the sheds

A roller in the shed!

 

Yes that was a surprise, here’s a few details of it

There was another one in a lock up, but that still worked apparently. Had a bar in it too!

Garden Feature 😀
Bandsaw Beehive
Tractor No.1
Tractor No.2
Cartwheel
The waterwheels.
Trough

My favourite part was the Water feature.

Water Feature

So that brings me to the end of showing you around the watermill, though if you were interested there’s plenty more to see in the full album (including rusty stuff embedded in ivy and cat pictures) in the full album HERE

All pictures embiggenable with a clickety click.

Oh and finally, it was quite cold in the evenings, and Phil had to pull out his boy scout skills!

Fireman Phil! 🙂

Newcastle Guild Hall, and Quayside ~ December 2017

On my last post, The Camel Parade, I said that that was the last report for a while as I’ve posted everything for my outings in 2017. Well I lied. 🙂 Not so much lied really, as completely overlooked mine and Sophies day out to see the Guildhall in Newcastle.  Usually you are not allowed in the building, but there are Heritage Open days where you can get a guided tour of it, and Sophie booked us to go on one.

The History Bit

The building was designed by Robert Trollope and completed in 1655. Trollope was a 17th-century English architect, born in Yorkshire, who worked mainly in Northumberland and Durham. A propos of nothing, he was buried in St Mary’s church Gateshead where he’d designed and built his own monument with statue of himself and inscription that reads
“Here lies Robert Trollop

Who made yon stones roll up

When death took his soul up

His body filled this hole up”.

More Pam Ayres than Wordsworth, but he lives on in his magnificent buildings.

The frontage of the building was rebuilt to designs by William Newton and David Stephenson in 1794. The east end of the building is an extension designed by John Dobson and completed in 1823.

So on with the pictures!

In the stairwell on the way up to the courtrooms

Charles II in Roman Army Gear, who knows why!  His feet look really big to me!

The statue was placed originally placed at the North End of the Tyne Bridge, on the restoration of Charles II to the throne.  It had the motto Adventus Regis solemn gregis. i.e the coming of the king is the comfort of his people.On 15th June 1771 it was moved and placed in a niche on the side of the Exchange (this is what the Guildhall was known as back then).  It was finally moved to where it is now in 1794.  I got this information from a book published in 1826 by John Sykes (bookseller of Newcastle), and the full fascinating story can be found HERE 

The courtroom

In 1649 15 people were hanged on the Town Moor for the crime of Witchcraft, they were tried here.

Mind your head!

The Merchant Adventurers Hall was quite something..

John 21:6 🙂
Ceiling detail
All the mayors coats of arms, from then until now.
Fake fire!

 

Had me fooled! 🙂

 

Stay tooned for part 2, which will be even more stunning than part 1, really! 😀

SaveSave