St Cuthberts Church ~ March 2019

The History bit The Domesday Book, is a manuscript record of the “Great Survey” of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. Both Ormesby Hall, and St Cuthbert’s church, are mentioned in this record and listed as belonging to ‘Orme’, to whose name the suffix ‘by’ (the Viking word for habitation or dwelling place) was added to make Ormesby.  There has been then, a church on this site for at least 933 years, maybe more. Unfortunately the church as it stands today has been largely rebuilt between 1875 and 1907 to…

Seaham ~ part 3 ~ St.Mary’s

The Church of St.Mary The Virgin, is on the list of the top 20 oldest churches in Britain.  It’s also the only surviving building of the original Saxon Village of Seaham Harbour. (now just Seaham). It was founded by King Æthelstan in 930AD and has 7th C late Anglo Saxon masonry and early Norman masonry in its nave, and a 13th-century chancel and west tower.  Over the 16th-century porch door is a late 18th-century sundial with an unusual verse, now illegible, which begins: “The natural clockwork by the mighty one wound up at first and ever since has gone…” which…

Washington Old Hall~July 2016 part 3

Part 1.  Part 2.   Technically speaking these shots are from the Holy Trinity church right next door to the hall, but we did it on the same day so I’ve chucked it in with the Hall report. 🙂 The History Bit Holy Trinity Church is known locally as the ‘Church on the hill’ and has been central to Washington’s large parish for centuries. The oval mound on which it stands, once within a rounded enclosure, suggests the re-use of a pagan site. Rounded churchyards usually have Celtic origins. Unfortunately the Domesday Book (1086-7) excludes places north of the Tees and…

Day 268~366

Hymns Ancient and Modern is a hymnal in common use within the Church of England and resulted out of the efforts of the Oxford Movement. Over the years it has grown into a large family of hymnals. As such, the Hymns Ancient and Modern set the standard for the current hymnal in the Church of England. The Oxford Movement, an ecclesiastical reform movement within the Anglican Church, wanted to recover the lost treasures of Breviaries and Service Books of the ancient Greek and Latin churches. As a result Greek, Latin and even German hymns in translation entered the mainstream of…

The Sunday Fraggle report ~ bits & bobs edition.

Well it’s slim pickings at the moment with my photography.  I’ve been working extra hours, and it gets dark here at 4.30pm so once I get home from work, sorted home work out, and had dinner, it’s being difficult to feel inspired or motivated. On top of that the weather is pants. But hey- ho I did get a couple to be going on with. Last weekend we went to the Annual Free convention held in Tynemouth, about 20 mins up the road from us. It’s (obviously) a yearly event where die hard fans of the band Free meet up,…

The Sunday Fraggle report~Hebburn edition.

Not enough bits and bobs to post yet, but here’s some more history and edumacation about the North East, and in particular Hebburn, a 10 minute drive down the road from me. Following on from the Winter Fair, Sophie and I noticed a tall spire in the not-too-distance and went off to explore which led to some interesting finds. Firstly this is St.Andrews church as we walked down the road. It looked very grand, but as we came closer it became apparent that the lower building to the left was separate from the church. The roof of the lower building…

The Shillington Church Report

During the Scarecrow Festival we came across All Saints Church, which as well as being a beauty, has a really great view. The church stands on a hill of domed chalk, and is built of ironstone (an iron rich sandstone with a mineral giving a greenish colour which darkens to brown on exposure to light).  It has been a place of worship for over 1000 years, with the present building dating from 1400 with only minor changes. We met the vicar while we were there and asked to take photo’s, he showed us some of the interesting stuff. Firstly a few…

The Warkworth Report ~ Village edition

At last the final set of photo’s from Warkworth! (previous post HERE ) After the Hermitage we walked back along the river and reached the village, which is very picturesque and tidy. All the cottages up this street are holiday rentals. Firstly we went off to visit the church lovely stain glass windows the grounds were cool too, with one 16th century grave of a chap known as ‘The Hunter” we also came across some strange sarcophagi and some architectural conundrums   after the church, we went to lunch and then walked up the hill back to the castle.   On…