Day 306~366

So on we go into November, and this month I am getting out my crystal balls and will be using them in my photography.  But first, I had a little fun last night with the trick or treaters who came to the house, and swapped a photograph for a treat.

Halloween 2016

I do this every year and the kids are great round here, smiley and nice and polite. I don’t know any of them and most are with parents. So far no-one has given me grief for taking their kids pics,  but then most of the kids are in disguise!

Also I thought I’d share a photo of Skye that I took this morning. She’s doing OK, a bit sicky now and then, but still eating and having cuddles and being a pest. I try not to think about what’s to come.

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And so onto the Crystal Ball Files! I have 4 of different sizes so will be having some fun with this!

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Day 305~366

‘Hells Bells Frego! What on earth’s going on?’
“I’m off out trick or treating with Mego, Clego and Bego. And I think Skego is coming too. Do you like my costume?
‘Umm well, yes I guess. You do know this is our last day together don’t you?’
“Of course I do, why?”
‘Well I just thought we’d spend our last evening together, you know, just me and you and Skego, have a couple of drinks, watch a spooky movie and have Pizza or something’
“Oh no, I’d much rather be out having fun with my pals, might see you when I get back,but don’t wait up.”
*sigh*

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Day 286~366

I had a busy day today, went to work, made teas for the shed men, met Phil after his work to go supermarket shopping, had dinner, and here I am now with my photo for today. I didn’t have chance to take Frego out, and anyway the weather was so yuck, more rain & clouds. So this evening Frego thought she’d process some photo’s, and Skego kept her company.

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Day 285~366

The weather has turned crappy here, and it’s cold and rainy and forecast to be so all week. :/  We were a bit fed up about it, but Frego amused herself by taking selfies with Skego, and adding filters and the like to them for her instagram account 🙂

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Apparently this is my 1000th post here on WP! Yay, go me!

 

Day 275~366

A new month starts today, and it’s lego month. For this I will be doing a series entitled “The Adventures of Frego”.

Frego shoots Skye
Frego shoots Skye

Day 243 & 244

 

 

The addition of colourants to foods is thought to have occurred in Egyptian cities as early as 1500 BC, when candy makers added natural extracts and wine to improve the products’ appearance. During the Middle Ages, the economy in the European countries was based on agriculture, and the peasants were accustomed to producing their own food locally or trading within the village communities. Under feudalism, aesthetic aspects were not considered, at least not by the vast majority of the generally very poor population. This situation changed with urbanization at the beginning of the Modern Age, when trade emerged—especially the import of precious spices and colours.
With the onset of the industrial revolution, people became dependent on foods produced by others. These new urban dwellers demanded food at low cost. Analytical chemistry was still primitive and regulations few. The adulteration of foods flourished. Heavy metal and other inorganic element-containing compounds turned out to be cheap and suitable to “restore” the colour of watered-down milk and other foodstuffs, some more lurid examples being: Red lead and vermillion were routinely used to colour cheese and confectionery.
Copper arsenite was used to recolour used tea leaves for resale. It also caused two deaths when used to colour a dessert in 1860.
Many colour additives had never been tested for toxicity or other adverse effects. Historical records show that injuries, even deaths, resulted from tainted colorants. In 1851, about 200 people were poisoned in England, 17 of them fatally, directly as a result of eating adulterated lozenges.In 1856, mauveine, the first synthetic colour, was developed by Sir William Henry Perkin and by the turn of the century, unmonitored color additives had spread through Europe and the United States in all sorts of popular foods, including ketchup, mustard, jellies, and wine.

Luckily, today both chemical and natural colourants are tested for safety. European Union (EU) legislation requires most additives used in foods to be labelled clearly in the list of ingredients, with their function, followed by either their name or E number. An E number means that it has passed safety tests and has been approved for use here and in the rest of the EU.

Of course that won’t apply now so we can all be poisoned 🙂

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Today I decided to play with the food colours I got,instead of doing research and stuff, it wasn’t as easy! I had a glass tank of water, an eye dropper, and my camera set on the burst mode, but getting the focus, exposure and aperture right was a right clart on, and I didn’t quite make it, but these are the best of a bad bunch. Also different colours have different viscosities and densities, the blue was hopeless, just splatted into a fuzzy cloud, whereas the green was just blobs on a string. The 2 top left were supposed to be red but look orange, but I think they were the best ones, anyway, it was fun to do.

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and this is how it was done

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Day 237~366

The process of glass blowing is long , hot, and arduous and would take far too long to write about here, but I can heartily recommend visiting a glass blowing factory and seeing it in action if you ever get the chance.
Glass colouring and colour marking may be obtained by the addition of colouring ions,by precipitation of nanometer sized colloides (so-called striking glasses such as “gold ruby”or red “selenium ruby”), by colored inclusions (as in milk glass and smoked glass), by light scattering (as in phase separated glass), 5) by dichroic coatings (see dichroic glass), or 6) by colored coatings.

I went to The Alum glass blowing workshop at The Needles in the Isle of Wight, and was amazed at watching the whole process.

Sulphur is used with Iron (Fe) and Carbon (C) to produce amber glass, the colour of which can vary from very light straw to a deep reddish-brown or even black. Under the strongly reducing conditions created by the carbon, iron polysulphides are formed and these give the required depth of colour. Which is what was used in my little glass cat that I bought there.

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Day 231~366

The colour brown is a serious, down-to-earth colour signifying stability, structure and support.

Relating to the protection and support of the family unit, with a keen sense of duty and responsibility, brown takes its obligations seriously. It encourages a strong need for security and a sense of belonging, with family and friends being of utmost importance.

In the meaning of colours, brown is the colour of material security and the accumulation of material possessions.

The colour brown relates to quality in everything – a comfortable home, the best food and drink and loyal companionship. It is a colour of physical comfort, simplicity and quality. Especially if you’re a cat.

From a negative perspective it can also give the impression of cheapness and stinginess in certain circumstances.

Brown is friendly and approachable. It is loyal, trustworthy and dependable in a practical and realistic way.

In colour psychology, brown is honest, genuine and sincere. It relates to the hardworking, the industrious and reliable, with both feet planted firmly on the ground. Unless you’re a cat 🙂

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Day 229~366

The meaning of colour 6~Pink
Pink is a combination of the color red and white, a hue that can be described as a tint. It can range from berry (blue-based) pinks to salmon (orange-based) pinks. Its symbolism is complex and its popularity is subject to so many influences.
Depending on your age and culture, you may remember pink Cadillacs, pink flamingos, Pink Floyd, the Pink Panther, and the pink triangles of the Third Reich (which were used to identify male homosexuals).
In almost every culture, one stereotype emerges: pink is associated with girls, blue with boys. Unfortunately, there is no consensus of opinion on its origin.

The origin of the English term “pink” is as valuable as any discourse on symbolism. Here are some interesting analyses:

In English, the word “pink” could be derived from the Dutch flower pinken dating back to 1681. The flower’s name could have originally been “pink eye” or “small eye.” Another possibility is the verb “to pink” – to prick or cut around the edges, as with pinking shears. The jagged petals of the flower looked as though they had been cut, thus explaining why it became known as the “pink.” (Jean Heifetz, When Blue Meant Yellow, p 110)

In colloquial language, to be “tickled pink” describes a state of joy, a “pink slip” is a notice that you’ve been fired from your job, to be “in the pink” suggest good fortune and health, and a “pinko” is a person who is extremely liberal, a socialist or a communist.

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