Day 236~366

Iridescence (also known as goniochromism) is the phenomenon of certain surfaces that appear to change colour as the angle of view or the angle of illumination changes. Examples of iridescence include soap bubbles, butterfly wings and sea shells, as well as certain minerals. It is often created by structural coloration (microstructures that interfere with light). The word iridescence is derived in part from the Greek word ἶρις îris (gen. ἴριδος íridos), meaning rainbow, and is combined with the Latin suffix -escent, meaning “having a tendency toward.” Iris in turn derives from the goddess Iris of Greek mythology, who is the…

Day 235~366

Sea shells are formed by the process of bio-mineralization where living organisms produce inorganic solids. Sea shells are the protective layers of marine animals called molluscs and other sea animals. The colour that a sea shell has is not just to make the shell look pretty. It often acts as a camouflage, hiding these small animals from the predators that hunt them. The different shell colouring and patterns is even a means by which different species communicate with each other. Impurities like metabolic waste products that are present when the shell is being formed, gives the shell a different colour….

Day 234~366

A kaleidoscope is an optical instrument in which bits of glass, held loosely at the end of a rotating tube, are shown in continually changing symmetrical forms by reflection in two or more mirrors set at angles to each other. A kaleidoscope operates on the principle of multiple reflection, where several mirrors are placed at an angle to one another. Typically there are three rectangular mirrors set at 60° to each other so that they form an equilateral triangle, but other angles and configurations are possible. The 60° angle generates an infinite regular grid of duplicate images of the original,…

Day233~366

A colour wheel or colour circle is an abstract illustrative organization of colour hues around a circle, which shows the relationships between primary colours, secondary colours, tertiary colours etc. The arrangement of colours around the colour circle is often considered to be in correspondence with the wavelengths of light, as opposed to hues, in accord with the original colour circle of Isaac Newton. Modern colour circles include the purples, however, between red and violet. Colour scientists and psychologists often use the additive primaries, red, green and blue; and often refer to their arrangement around a circle as a colour circle…

Day 232~366

How do flowers get their colours? Why are roses red and violets blue? People always admire the beautiful colours of flowers in bloom but rarely does anyone know the perfect science that goes into the colour production of one of the earth’s greatest natural beauties. The colour of flowers, such as the red in roses and yellow in marigolds, are found in pigments that are decided upon in the hereditary genome of the plant. Flower colours of red, pink, blue and purple come mainly from the pigments called anthocyanins, which are in the class of chemicals called flavanoids (what gives…

Day 231~366

The colour brown is a serious, down-to-earth colour signifying stability, structure and support. Relating to the protection and support of the family unit, with a keen sense of duty and responsibility, brown takes its obligations seriously. It encourages a strong need for security and a sense of belonging, with family and friends being of utmost importance. In the meaning of colours, brown is the colour of material security and the accumulation of material possessions. The colour brown relates to quality in everything – a comfortable home, the best food and drink and loyal companionship. It is a colour of physical…

Day 230~366

Are Black & White colours? Are black and white colours when generated as light? 1. Black is the absence of colour (and is therefore not a colour) Explanation: When there is no light, everything is black. Test this out by going into a photographic dark room. There are no photons of light. In other words, there are no photons of colours. 2. White is the blending of all colours and is a colour. Explanation: Light appears colourless or white. Sunlight is white light that is composed of all the colours of the spectrum. A rainbow is proof. You can’t see…

Day 229~366

The meaning of colour 6~Pink Pink is a combination of the color red and white, a hue that can be described as a tint. It can range from berry (blue-based) pinks to salmon (orange-based) pinks. Its symbolism is complex and its popularity is subject to so many influences. Depending on your age and culture, you may remember pink Cadillacs, pink flamingos, Pink Floyd, the Pink Panther, and the pink triangles of the Third Reich (which were used to identify male homosexuals). In almost every culture, one stereotype emerges: pink is associated with girls, blue with boys. Unfortunately, there is no…

Day 228~366

The meaning of colours 5~Blue Blue has more complex and contradictory meanings than any other color. These can be easily explained by pinpointing by the specific shade of blue. Bright blue: cleanliness, strength, dependability, coolness (The origin of these meanings arise from the qualities of the ocean and inland waters, most of which are more tangible.) Light (sky) blue: peace, serenity, ethereal, spiritual, infinity (The origin of these meanings is the intangible aspects of the sky.) Most blues convey a sense of trust, loyalty, cleanliness, and understanding. On the other hand, blue evolved as symbol of depression in American culture….