365 ~ 28th Feb ~ 6th March

Here we are into March already, and this what the bumf is on this month.

Let’s see where March takes us. Will your photography change as the month progresses? Will you be more creative or inspired? Will your photography blossom with the buds? We lost all of our seasons in 2020 when our world turned upside down in March. I am hoping and praying that this March sees us coming out of our cocoon transformed. Will we look at things differently? Will we appreciate freedom and new growth. If 2020 was a metaphor for slowing down and noticing more, maybe 2021 will be a metaphor for transformation, appreciation and gratitude. Maybe we will appreciate the things we do have and grumble less? Something you might consider doing this year, if this is not your first 365 adventure, would be to compare monthly photographs from last year to this year and see if you notice a change in creativity or attitude. There may be a pattern, or not. You might actually find that your photographs were more creative when there was little else to do. Let’s see what our photography says about us this month. I believe it will be wonderful!

So positive these ladies who run the prompts. I am definitely coming out of the cocoon transformed ~ by about 5lbs extra and it’s not easy to shift it! I don’t expect I’ll grumble less though. So on with the show Fraggle!

Day 59 ~ We are back to self -portrait week, gah, and with reflection as the main theme, so the first one is our reflection. Well my reflection obviously, not yours.

reflection. me. again. sigh.

Day 60 ~ Delight. Today you are encouraged to share a glimpse of your day with this month’s “Where I Stand” prompt.  How can you be creative with your POV to show us where you stand today? Don’t forget to try include this week’s theme of reflection. What delightful place are you standing in today?  Show us your world today!

Yet again thwarted by being at work all day. I was so busy I just didn’t get a chance to do the photo at work, so had to do it at home instead. Nothing I did turned out OK, and by the time I realised that, it was dark. I ended up sitting on my bed in front of the mirror and tickling Vinnie when he came to see what I was doing, I suppose Vinnie can be classed as a delight. This is such a s**t photo I’m embarassed to post it, but hey ho, warts and all. 🥴. I am beginning to hate selfie week, whereas before I just didn’t like it. 😔

Delight

Day 61~ Button. Figuratively? Button. Button Up. Button your lip. Button your mouth? Or… Literally? Buttons on your coat? Buttons on your pillows? A collection of buttons? I am working on buttoning my lip. Sometimes it’s more important to retain relationships than to speak your mind.

The lady who posted this prompt put an accompanying picture of herself with a button over her mouth. I had a total WTH am I doing here moment and nearly gave up there and then. Another work day but I got home knowing what I would do so managed to get a shot before the light went. My favourite button.

Button

Day 62 ~ Exhilaration. ~ Exhilaration is defined as “a feeling of excitement, happiness, or elation.”  As we continue thinking about reflection during this Picture You week, we can also approach reflection in the sense of how we see ourselves, i.e. personal reflection.  What makes you feel excited or happy deep down inside? Look inside yourself today.  Reflect on what brings you a feeling of excitement and happiness.  Photograph what exhilaration looks like for you.

This one had me stymied, as getting exhilarated at work is really not an option. Luckily Morrison’s Supermarket came to the rescue again! I think it might be my muse! I found that Cadbury’s have re-launched their Old Jamaica Rum & Raisin Bournville Chocolate bars. It used to be my Mum’s favourite and she would share it with me. They stopped making it in 2010. My Mum died in 2004 ( not because of the chocolate) so seeing it on the shelves again made me think happy thoughts of her. I was so exhilarated I bought up all the bars on the shelf! 🤣. You might notice that I am not in the photo because it isn’t a literal reflection but a figuritive one, even though I’m still meant to be in it I think. Talking of literal, I have noticed that other people following the prompts don’t always do all of the prompt. Prompts come in 2 or 3 bits, the theme for the week, i.e self portrait, landscape etc etc, but each day has a different title, i.e Segment, Delight etc etc. Sometimes there’s added stuff like reflection this week on top of Selfie. The more enlightened just take what they want from the prompt, so long as a bit of it is in it seems to be fine. I’ve been taking the prompts prescriptively instead of using them as a guide, so I’m going to be a bit more free with my interpretations!

Exhilaration

Day 63 ~ Street. It’s amazing how the simple name of a street can be a reflection of who you are, where you’ve been, and even where you are headed. Some of us have lived on too many streets to count, while others just a few.  How is a street in your life a reflection of you? I’m looking forward to seeing the streets from around the world today!

Well this one got me thinking about all the places I have lived, 7 counties, Lancashire, Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Bedfordshire,Hertfordshire and Tyne & Wear, RAF camps x 2, apartments x 2 rented and bought houses, it’s been a bit of a journey! I got out my box of old photo’s and found some of the streets I lived on, and had a pleasant trog down memory lane (Pete will be impressed 🙂 ) for a couple of hours.

Street

Day 64 ~ Positive. As water reflects the face, so one’s life reflects the heart – proverb. Positive thinking is when we consciously cultivate positivity in our minds so that we think we can get through anything. It’s been scientifically proven to improve your work life, physical and metal health, and relationships. The covid 19 pandemic has certainly caused us all to reflect. Sometimes it is hard to not choose negativity.  Get outside today and see if you can find yourself in a reflection.  Look at yourself in that reflection and find yourself.  If you can’t get outside, find yourself in a mirror or a window.  Have a look and make a positive comment to yourself because you are awesome!

I walked my awesome self up to the shop and looked for puddles along the way as we’ve had a fair bit of rain (surprise~not) lately. I found a really nice one so plopped the camera down, stuck it on a 10 second timer, ran to the end of the puddle and did a little happy dance of positivity and hoped no-one was looking out of their window, and if they were, a second hope they didn’t call for the men from the funny~farm. I took one shot and legged it. Shame about the wheely bin, but moving it may well have resulted in a disgruntled audience. Or the police 🤣

Positive

Day 65 ~ Hobby. Do you have a hobby? A favorite pastime? Something that you enjoy in your downtime? Something that helps you relax?  A diversion just for fun? As we reflect on Picture You Week, show us what piques your interest when you have a little extra time to spare. 

Well this was a bit of a gift for me. Time to show off the mosaics. Although Winnie got in on the act so no doubt she’ll get all the attention. 🙄😊

hobby Winnie 😊

So that’s another week done! Stay tooned, ‘street’ photography is next week’s theme. That’s going to need a fair amount of outside-the-box interpretation!

Newcastle – Sept 2019 – people

Just some people I spotted on our walk around Gateshead & Newcastle.

At Venice Beach 🙂
The force is with them
Geordie Shore
02
Up
It wasn’t that bad!
Liquid Lunch
Three Hens
Walking Dudettes
Wait-ers
Party Girls
Living out of a suitcase.

All pictures embiggenable with a little click

An album of all the Newcastle pictures can be found HERE

Stay tooned for our next adventure. 🙂

Cleadon – March 2019

After Sophie and I had finished looking around Souter Lighthouse we decided to go and have a look around Cleadon Village, but before we do lets have a quick look at the Lime Kilns just across the road from the Lighthouse.

These mahousive kilns were built in the 1870’s. Limestone from the quarry and coal from the colliery were fed into the top of the kilns and heated to produce lime for use in agriculture and in the steel & chemical industries. The lime was loaded onto railway wagons known as the Marsden Rattler, and transported to the docks at South Shields. They are a scheduled monument now.

So off to Cleadon then!

Cleadon is a village on the outskirts of South Shields, and it’s where all the posh people live 🙂 . There’s been a village there for over a thousand years and it has a village pond that is a remnant of an ice age lake and dates to Roman times (as do most things!) so we went to see it.

Cleadon Ice Age Duck pond.

Ice Age Daffodils 🙂

We also wanted to see Cleadon Grotto (just because there are no other grotto’s we know of 🙂 ) and went off to Cleadon Park where we thought it was.  Except we wandered around the huge park for ages and couldn’t find it.

But the park was nice to walk in, here are a few shots of it

Crawler Tree

Bread Tree

I’d told Phil we were going to Cleadon and he said to look out for a huge rock in the park.

Phils Rock

Sophie resorted to Lord Google and found out we were in the wrong park to see the grotto 🙄🤭 so back in the car and finally found it.

An 18th century garden ornament that originally overlooked a formal pond in the grounds of Cleadon House. There isn’t a house there now, nor a pond.

And here it is..

Grotty Grotto.

Not very enthralling I admit, but still a little slice of history.

Stay tooned for next time when we’re off to Embleton Bay.

 

 

 

The Art of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne – Jan 2019

Back in January Sophie and I decided to visit a couple of the art galleries in Newcastle, The Biscuit Factory –  the biggest commercial art, craft and design gallery in the UK, and The Laing, home to an internationally important collection of art, focusing on British oil paintings, watercolours, ceramics, silver, and glassware.

But before we get to the galleries, we must get off the metro at Central station and walk to Ouseburn, there’s plenty of photo ops along the way.  We get to the crossing over the central motorway, and before the crossing, we see The Oxford.

£134 per week.

Surrounded

The Oxford Galleries dance hall on Newcastle’s New Bridge Street opened in 1925 and was one of the most popular venues of its time. Over the years it went through many reincarnations and was known to generations of dancers and partygoers as Tiffany’s, Ikon, Ritzy’s and Liquid Envy. In 2017, the building was converted into student accommodation with only its listed frontage remaining. There’s progress for you.

Looking back when crossing the motorway we see

Dereliction

am not sure but think this used to be a Premier Inn.

Over the motorway crossing, we can see the reason for so much student accommodation,

Northumberland University – City Campus East

City Campus East, designed by Atkins, opened in September 2007, winning awards from The Journal newspaper and the Low Carbon New Build Project of the Year accolade. It t is home to the Schools of Law, Design and the Newcastle Business School.

Crossing over the central motorway, the Tyne Bridge & Newcastle Cathedral in the distance

There’s a saying in England- “It’s grim up North”…

Under the flyover

As we walked past the college we realised there was a football match imminent.

Jolly Boys

There are a fair few historic buildings in this area of the Toon (as Newcastle is called by natives)

The Dispensary was established in April 1777 and funded through subscriptions, gifts and legacies. Its first site was in The Side but in 1782 or 1783 it moved to Pilgrim Street where it remained until 1790. For the next fifty years, the Trustees leased a building in Low Friar Chare. At the expiry of the lease, the Dispensary moved to 14 Nelson Street, where it remained until 1928. Its final move was to 115 New Bridge Street which was still its home when it finally closed in 1976.  Now a Chinese store.

Public Washery

This former municipal washhouse and baths are located on the corner of Gibson Street and New Bridge Street in Newcastle. It was built in 1907 and designed by F H Halford. The baths had separate men’s and women’s entrances and are notable for its ornate tiles. The baths were closed in 1965 after which the pool was boarded over, and sometimes used as a badminton court. During the Second World War, the pool was used by the Fire Service as a reservoir, for water used to put out fires caused by air raids. The former baths are a Grade II listed building.  I would love to go in as I’ve seen pictures of the inside, the tiles are gorgeous, but the council is trying to sell it off so it’s unobtainable for now.

next to it is St.Dominic’s Priory.

A Roman Catholic church, by Dunn and Hansom, it has a foundation stone dated 1887 and is a Grade II listed building.

Back over the road where there is more rather gaudy student accommodation

It’s not easy being green

Got the blues

we saw a student at the window 🙂

Maggie

and finally, we get to the Biscuit Factory

The gallery’s home is a former Victorian warehouse, constructed in 1870. Prior to 2002, the Building was used in the manufacturing of biscuits.  Surprise surprise!

But that’s enough for today, stay tooned for next time when we will go and see the beautiful artworks and craftworks the gallery holds.

 

Camel Parade~South Shields~ Dec 2017~ part 1

2017 saw the 4th year that the Camel Parade has been an event in South Shields, Sophie and I went for the first time last year a few photo’s of which I posted HERE, so this year we made a return trip knowing what to expect.  It involves 3 camels with their handlers and riders dressed up as wise men, parading the length of Ocean Road, which is quite a long old road, followed by stilt walkers and a drum group called Sparks! It’s been controversial as the animal rights group PETA, who I have a lot of time for usually, have decreed it bad, and say that camels shouldn’t be used for public entertainment. I kind of agree with the sentiment, but really, all they do is walk the camels down the road, and then put them back in their vehicle and bugger off.  They don’t get prodded or poked or stand around being gawped at. PETA Campaigns Strategist Luke Steele said: “Using live animals in these sorts of events sends a damaging message to young people that animals are little more than living props”, according to our local newspaper, with one of the comments underneath being “it’s disgraceful that anyone should find this acceptable.  It’s not about the climate, it’s about the crowds, noise and the basic lack of respect enough to use animals for our entertainment. Animals are sentient beings, they are here for their own purpose, not for human monsters to use and abuse as they wish.  It’s archaic and needs to be stopped!”  I have to say the human monsters, particularly the baby monsters loved the whole shebang, and this monster doesn’t get to photograph many camels in our neck of the woods so was happy to see them.  I expect eventually the council will give in and the camels will come no more.

A lot of monsters turned up for the parade, and luckily it didn’t rain.

The trees along Ocean Road were all lit up

and the kiddies all waiting for the show to begin

the camels came first

so fluffy!

they were followed by stilt walkers I think representing the 3 shepherds

and this guy who was I think, the star of Bethlehem

then “The Creative Seed” wagon came, but I’m not sure what that was all about!

and these were followed by my favourite part, the Sparks! drum group

at the bottom of the road a stage was set up which Sparks! ascended and then played a cracking set of drum tunes. Well not tunes really but whatever it is that drums do without other instruments being about.

they somehow illuminate themselves and the drums and the whole thing is quite exciting to watch

stay tooned for the 2nd part when we see the firework display!

(pictures clickable for embiggening)

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Bridges Over the River Tyne~ Part 4

Part 1 HERE. Part 2 HERE. Part 3 HERE

After crossing back to the Newcastle side of the swing bridge, we walked down to the millennium bridge.  A Sunday Market is held on the quayside every week we were of course distracted by all the wares and people, so took our time and took some photo’s.

I think Gypsy Rose Lee had a very large family 😉

I have no idea where the horse was!

Theres always a busker~this chap had a really nice voice

Some interesting food stalls

Some traditional Geordie bangers

Pease pudding is a thing up here

Lunch queue

No queue, but he looked happy enough

HUGE cheese sandwich

Roast Pork burgers

Wiga Wagaa chilli stall

Next time we’ll look at the arts and crafts and get to the Millennium bridge.

 

 

Newcastle International Fair~part 4

Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 

Still wandering around Newcastle after the fair, more shots in the indoor Grainger Marcket

lovely roof

not amused

Cobblers

woof!

Batty

Couldn’t believe there was a pigs head on the counter! I mean, who the fook would eat a pigs head??

these 2 little girls were fascinated by it

hair cut?

After the market we sat and had a coffee and did some people watching

Hold the phone!

Wooly minded

Part 5 (final bit 🙂 ) still to come.

Newcastle International Fair ~part 3

Part 1 HERE
Part 2 HERE

Well actually at this point we left the area where the fair was and went on a wander so the rest of my shots are of and around Newcastle

crying girl

I feel so bad for homeless people and always give them something for a cup of tea or a sandwich, but this guy was asleep so I went by quietly

not a happy bunny

massage parlour ~ didn’t go in 🙂

works of art

megabus!

upside down

Gold!

Granger Market

London 282 miles?? (actually 247 as the crow flies)

The Grand Bazaar!

Still more to come from this day out, hope everyone had a good weekend!

Day 261~366

Many public bus services are run to a specific timetable giving specific times of departure and arrival at waypoints along the route. These are often difficult to maintain in the event of traffic congestion, breakdowns, on/off bus incidents, road blockages or bad weather. Predictable effects such as morning and evening rush hour traffic are often accounted for in timetables using past experience of the effects, although this then prevents the opportunity for drafting a ‘clock face’ timetable where the time of a bus is predictable at any time through the day. Predictable short term increases in passenger numbers may be dealt with by providing “duplicate” buses, where two or more buses operate the same slot in the timetable. Unpredictable problems resulting in delays and gaps in the timetabled service may be dealt with by ‘turning’ a bus early before it reaches it terminus, so that it can fill a gap in the opposite direction, meaning any passengers on the turned bus need to disembark and continue on a following bus. Also, depending on the location of the bus depot, replacement buses may be dispatched from the depot to fill in other gaps, starting the timetable part way along the route.
There is a common cliché that people “wait all day, and then three come along at once”, in relation to a phenomenon where evenly timetabled bus services can develop a gap in service followed by buses turning up almost simultaneously. This occurs when the rush hour begins and numbers of passengers at a stop increases, increasing the loading time, and thus delay scheduled service. The following bus then catches up because it begins to be delayed less at stops due to fewer passengers waiting. This is called bus bunching. This is prevented in some cities such as Berlin by assigning every stop arrival times where scheduled buses should arrive no earlier than specified.
Some services may have no specific departure times, the timetable giving the frequency of service on a route at particular phases of the day. This may be specified with departure times, but the over-riding factor is ensuring the regularity of buses arriving at stops. These are often the more frequent services, up to the busiest bus rapid transit schemes. For headway-based schemes, problems can be managed by changing speed, delaying at stops and leap-frogging a bus boarding at a stop.
Services may be strictly regulated in terms of level of adherence to timetables, and how often timetables may be changed. Operators and authorities may employ on street bus inspectors to monitor adherence in real time. Service operators often have a control room, or in the case of large operations, route controllers, who can monitor the level of service on routes and can take remedial action if problems occur. This was made easier with the technological advances of two way radio contact with drivers, and vehicle tracking systems.

(info from wiki)

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