Cleadon – March 2019

After Sophie and I had finished looking around Souter Lighthouse we decided to go and have a look around Cleadon Village, but before we do lets have a quick look at the Lime Kilns just across the road from the Lighthouse. These mahousive kilns were built in the 1870’s. Limestone from the quarry and coal from the colliery were fed into the top of the kilns and heated to produce lime for use in agriculture and in the steel & chemical industries. The lime was loaded onto railway wagons known as the Marsden Rattler, and transported to the docks at…

The Art of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne – Jan 2019

Back in January Sophie and I decided to visit a couple of the art galleries in Newcastle, The Biscuit Factory –  the biggest commercial art, craft and design gallery in the UK, and The Laing, home to an internationally important collection of art, focusing on British oil paintings, watercolours, ceramics, silver, and glassware. But before we get to the galleries, we must get off the metro at Central station and walk to Ouseburn, there’s plenty of photo ops along the way.  We get to the crossing over the central motorway, and before the crossing, we see The Oxford. The Oxford…

Camel Parade~South Shields~ Dec 2017~ part 1

2017 saw the 4th year that the Camel Parade has been an event in South Shields, Sophie and I went for the first time last year a few photo’s of which I posted HERE, so this year we made a return trip knowing what to expect.  It involves 3 camels with their handlers and riders dressed up as wise men, parading the length of Ocean Road, which is quite a long old road, followed by stilt walkers and a drum group called Sparks! It’s been controversial as the animal rights group PETA, who I have a lot of time for…

Bridges Over the River Tyne~ Part 4

Part 1 HERE. Part 2 HERE. Part 3 HERE After crossing back to the Newcastle side of the swing bridge, we walked down to the millennium bridge.  A Sunday Market is held on the quayside every week we were of course distracted by all the wares and people, so took our time and took some photo’s. I think Gypsy Rose Lee had a very large family 😉 I have no idea where the horse was! Theres always a busker~this chap had a really nice voice Some interesting food stalls Some traditional Geordie bangers Pease pudding is a thing up here…

Newcastle International Fair~part 4

Part 1 Part 2 Part 3  Still wandering around Newcastle after the fair, more shots in the indoor Grainger Marcket lovely roof not amused Cobblers woof! Batty Couldn’t believe there was a pigs head on the counter! I mean, who the fook would eat a pigs head?? these 2 little girls were fascinated by it hair cut? After the market we sat and had a coffee and did some people watching Hold the phone! Wooly minded Part 5 (final bit 🙂 ) still to come.

Newcastle International Fair ~part 3

Part 1 HERE Part 2 HERE Well actually at this point we left the area where the fair was and went on a wander so the rest of my shots are of and around Newcastle crying girl I feel so bad for homeless people and always give them something for a cup of tea or a sandwich, but this guy was asleep so I went by quietly not a happy bunny massage parlour ~ didn’t go in 🙂 works of art megabus! upside down Gold! Granger Market London 282 miles?? (actually 247 as the crow flies) The Grand Bazaar! Still…

Day 261~366

Many public bus services are run to a specific timetable giving specific times of departure and arrival at waypoints along the route. These are often difficult to maintain in the event of traffic congestion, breakdowns, on/off bus incidents, road blockages or bad weather. Predictable effects such as morning and evening rush hour traffic are often accounted for in timetables using past experience of the effects, although this then prevents the opportunity for drafting a ‘clock face’ timetable where the time of a bus is predictable at any time through the day. Predictable short term increases in passenger numbers may be…

The Sunday Fraggle report~ Part 1

Decent weather on Friday had me out and about in my neighbourhood with the Fuji in hand, and just down the road from me is Wardley Colliery, a disused coal mine opened in 1855 and closed down in 1974. It’s now a place for graffiti artists to practice their stuff, and a permanent reminder of the demise of one of the great industries of the North. Whilst wandering around I came across a young chap and his paint cans, of course taking his photo would not have been OK but he let me take a picture of what he had…