Day 274~366

The electric telephone was invented in the 1870s, it was based on earlier work with harmonic (multi-signal) telegraphs. The first commercial telephone services were set up in 1878 and 1879 on both sides of the Atlantic in the cities of New Haven and London. Alexander Graham Bell held the master patent for the telephone that… Continue Reading


Day 273~366

Revolutions per minute (abbreviated rpm, RPM, rev/min, r/min) is a measure of the frequency of rotation, specifically the number of rotations around a fixed axis in one minute. It is used as a measure of rotational speed of a mechanical component. In the French language, tr/mn (tours par minute) is the common abbreviation. The German… Continue Reading


Day 272~366

A fluid ounce is a unit of volume typically used for measuring liquids. It is equivalent to approximately 30 millilitres. Whilst various definitions have been used throughout history, two remain in common use: the imperial and the United States customary fluid ounce. An imperial fluid ounce is 1⁄20 of an imperial pint, 1⁄160 of an… Continue Reading


Day 271~366

Prior to the introduction of number plates there was the Locomotive and Highways Act 1896, which contributed to the rise in popularity for motor vehicles. The Act increased the speed limit and introduced compulsory lights for safety, but more relevantly it required vehicles to be registered by the local council. Even such ideas like driving… Continue Reading


Day 270~377

An ISBN is an International Standard Book Number. ISBNs were 10 digits in length up to the end of December 2006, but since 1 January 2007 they now always consist of 13 digits. ISBNs are calculated using a specific mathematical formula and include a check digit to validate the number. Each ISBN consists of 5… Continue Reading


Day 269~366

Lumens measure how much light you are getting from a bulb. More lumens means it’s a brighter light; fewer lumens means it’s a dimmer light. Lumens let you buy the amount of light you want. So when buying your new bulbs, think lumens, not watts. The brightness, or lumen levels, of the lights in your… Continue Reading


Day 268~366

Hymns Ancient and Modern is a hymnal in common use within the Church of England and resulted out of the efforts of the Oxford Movement. Over the years it has grown into a large family of hymnals. As such, the Hymns Ancient and Modern set the standard for the current hymnal in the Church of… Continue Reading


Day 267~366

The tarot (first known as trionfi and later as tarocchi, tarock, and others) is a pack of playing cards (most commonly numbering 78), used from the mid-15th century in various parts of Europe to play a group of card games such as Italian tarocchini and French tarot. From the late 18th century until the present… Continue Reading


Day 266~366

100 days left now 🙂 Quinquereme is (apparently) an absorbing nautical dice game of strategy and chance,of Ancient Rome. The instructions are quite mind boggling, so I will spare you the details, but basically each player has 3 throws of the dice at each turn, and keep some dice back each time to try and… Continue Reading


Day 265~366

The small calorie or gram calorie (symbol: cal) is the approximate amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of one gram of water by one degree Celsius at a pressure of one atmosphere. The large calorie or kilogram calorie (symbol: Cal), also known as the food calorie and similar names, is defined in terms… Continue Reading


Day 264~366

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. The use of Roman numerals continued long after the decline of the Roman Empire.… Continue Reading


Day 263~366

An audiogram is a graph that shows the audible threshold for standardized frequencies as measured by an audiometer. The Y axis represents intensity measured in decibels and the X axis represents frequency measured in Hertz.The threshold of hearing is plotted relative to a standardised curve that represents ‘normal’ hearing, in dB(HL). Audiograms are set out… Continue Reading


Day 262~366

If you need an illustration of the accelerating speed of technological change, look no further than the electronic calculator, that modest little device that does the most complex sum instantly and that you hold in the palm of your hand. Or more likely don’t any more… for the pocket calculator, which took more than four… Continue Reading


Day 261~366

Many public bus services are run to a specific timetable giving specific times of departure and arrival at waypoints along the route. These are often difficult to maintain in the event of traffic congestion, breakdowns, on/off bus incidents, road blockages or bad weather. Predictable effects such as morning and evening rush hour traffic are often… Continue Reading


Day 260~366

A clock is an instrument to indicate, keep, and co-ordinate time. The word clock is derived ultimately (via Dutch, Northern French, and Medieval Latin) from the Celtic words clagan and clocca meaning “bell”. A silent instrument missing such a striking mechanism has traditionally been known as a timepiece.In general usage today a “clock” refers to… Continue Reading