365 ~ 14th ~ 20th February

Well this was ‘pink’ week and I’ll be honest, pink’s OK for nail polish and lippy, and flowers of course, but that’s about as much as I’m bothered with it, or so I thought. However, it seems I have been fooling myself as I seem to have way more pink stuff than I realised!

Day 45~Treasure ~ Happy Valentines Day! Pink is a delicate colour.  It represents all things sweet, nice, playful, cute, romantic, charming, feminine and tender.  It is associated with bubblegum, babies, little girls, cotton candy and sweetness!  What can you find today that is pretty in pink! Not so much pretty, but at least a ‘treasure’, my World’s Greates Mum rosette which Ben gave me when he was a youngster, and he and my grandson really are my treasures, as are my photo’s of them.

Treasure

Day 46~ Meditative ~ As we continue with Pink color week, I want to encourage you to be mindful and present as you go through your day!  Keep an eye out for the pinks that catch your attention. You may discover pink in the most unexpected place; like these little pinks I found washed up along the shore!  Hope you are surprised by what you find today! Can’t wait to see!  I was at work all day and not much pinks going on there unless we count the ear canal which is (mostly) pink but I’m not allowed to photograph. As it happened though I was sent to pick up lunches at Morrisons and came across this big candle with a pink flower embedded in it so I got that for the photo today.

Meditative

Day 47~ Blurry ~ I just happened to have some pink glitter and scrapbook paper handy to execute my idea today.  I set this up by propping up my paper, getting my camera in place and ready to shoot with my remote, and then I stood behind the paper and just poured the glitter out while using a slower shutter speed and voila – a blurry pink photo!  Slow shutter speeds will be your friend today (and lots of patience as well).  *Sigh* Who I ask you has pink glitter and scrapbooks just ‘handy’?? I have my phone handy, and my purse and some tissues. Who are these people? Roses will suffice.

Blurry

Day 48~ One of the definitions of passion is “an extreme interest in something.”  The colour pink is said to be a combination of the passion of red mixed with the purity of white.    Putting them together for today’s photo seems to be a perfect match.   We all have our individual passions and interests.  As 365’ers I think it’s safe to say that one of them is  photography.   When you think of passion, what comes to mind?  What are you passionate about photographing?  Capture your passion and bonus points if includes the colour pink. I am so glad she defined this as “an extreme interest in something”  and I didn’t have to snog my bloke (again) for a photo. So, mosaic tiles instead, mosaics being my 2nd passion. Or 3rd if we’re counting my hubby, which I wasn’t but I will in case he reads this. ♥️

Passion

Day 49~ Down ~You can interpret today’s prompt a couple of ways.  Are you feeling down? Maybe something pink may cheer you up. Or…you can shoot down for your photo. Think flatlay. Have you ever taken time to experiment with unusual backdrops? The roses in my photo were placed on a cookie sheet. Doesn’t that give it more interest? You can shoot high key on a white background, you can go dark and moody with a black background. You can use contrasting colors. It’s totally up to you. But, think about shooting down on your pink subject and think of a way to make the background interesting so that the pink will pop! Think I did this one OK, it’s not a flatlay but I did shoot down, and the words are motivational/funny for when you are down. Also- cool background and the pink is a’poppin’!

Down

Day 50~ Circle ~ Am I the only one who thinks doughnut when the prompt words are pink and circle? When you are intentionally trying to include shapes in a photo, it is fun to incorporate both the obvious and the maybe not so obvious.  In this photo, the doughnut is the obvious subject.  Its shape is enhanced by the circle of the stand.  The hole in the center of the doughnut continues the “theme” as does the base of the stand even though the circle is incomplete.  The eye is expecting to see circles, so it will find the incomplete ones as well. How many circles can you include in your photo today? Doughnuts shmonuts! Prawn vol au vents for this puppy! 14 circles. I’m winning at pink!

circle

Day 51 ~ Take a photo of something pink that presents itself to you today. You may remember back in December I was looking after Sophies cats for 2 weeks whilst she went off to Spain to stay for Christmas with her chap. Well Sophie is still in Spain due to Covid travel and quarantine problems and we’ve still got the cats. Yesterday I got on Amazon and ordered some toys for them, and today the Postman presented me with a package, and I presented the cats with the contents of it. There were many lurid colours, so I did the selective colour thing, (which I’m none too fond of but sometimes has to be done) to pick out all the pink bits. Not as sharp as I’d like, but was wanting to get one with Vinnie inside it and he moves fast for a big guy! Also, Vincent’s nose, so cute 😀

Present

So that’s the end of pink week, but stay tooned! as tomorrow we start symmetry week.

Fraggle Report~The Hoppings ~ June 2017~Part 1

The Hoppings is is an annual travelling funfair held on the Town Moor in Newcastle upon Tyne, during the last week in June and is one of Europe’s largest travelling funfairs. The origin of the name is uncertain but could be that “hopping”, means a dance in Middle English (Old fairs included dancing), or from the clothing which the travellers used to wear; that being of old, sack-like tops and pants. Clothing often became infested with fleas from the animals that travelled with the fair. People were often seen “jumping” or “hopping” about itching from the bites which they received, or the name may derive from the Anglo-Saxon word “hoppen” meaning funfair. The last makes more sense to me but who knows? The fair began as a Temperance Fair in 1882, and has been on every year since then with a couple of exceptions. This year they had a Military Show at the far end of the grounds so Phil and I got on the metro and off we went. It was a mad hot day with temperatures around 30degrees but we had hats on and water with us. Although the funfair part wasn’t our thing it was great for colours and photographs so I took a fair few on the way through to the military bit.

Ghost Train 1

 

No way in hell would you get me on one of these!

No no and thrice no!

 

Ghost Train 2

Felt sorry for the donkey’s in the heat :/

Dave and Dixie

 

I ❤ You too!

 

Will someone get me down from this undignified position!

 

More to come so stay tooned! 🙂

 

 

Day 365~366

Tonight Phil came with me to photograph the bridges over the Tyne. I’ve seen loads from other people, and it probably doesn’t look any different to those, but this is mine and I’m chuffed it turned out so well.

 

I took a few others so here are they,

The millennium bridge and The Baltic

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The millennium bridge and The Sage

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The Sage

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and my shot of the day.. ta da!

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Day 351~366

Popped up to Penshaw’s Monument this evening, as I’d read they have a new cost efficient LED lighting system for it.  It used to be lit up with static yellow lamps, but now the colours move around the monument, tried to get them all in but even on a long exposure I missed getting the green in!

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Day 319~366

I took the ball to  ST.Mary’s Lighthouse this afternoon after work, and had a play. The tide was all the way in so couldn’t get onto the beach at all, but that wasn’t a problem. First though a couple of shots taken with the I-phone, got a new app called Filmborn, and this was taken with the kodak portra 400 setting.

ST.Mary's Lighthouse
ST.Mary’s Lighthouse

 

I also did a pano for fun and because the sky was quite spectacular

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Panorama at St.Mary’s Lighthouse. Iphone6

and then my regular crystal ball shot(s) with the old Fuji,

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I liked this next one best

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Hoping to get a superman shot tonight but there’s a lot of cloud about!

 

Day 243 & 244

 

 

The addition of colourants to foods is thought to have occurred in Egyptian cities as early as 1500 BC, when candy makers added natural extracts and wine to improve the products’ appearance. During the Middle Ages, the economy in the European countries was based on agriculture, and the peasants were accustomed to producing their own food locally or trading within the village communities. Under feudalism, aesthetic aspects were not considered, at least not by the vast majority of the generally very poor population. This situation changed with urbanization at the beginning of the Modern Age, when trade emerged—especially the import of precious spices and colours.
With the onset of the industrial revolution, people became dependent on foods produced by others. These new urban dwellers demanded food at low cost. Analytical chemistry was still primitive and regulations few. The adulteration of foods flourished. Heavy metal and other inorganic element-containing compounds turned out to be cheap and suitable to “restore” the colour of watered-down milk and other foodstuffs, some more lurid examples being: Red lead and vermillion were routinely used to colour cheese and confectionery.
Copper arsenite was used to recolour used tea leaves for resale. It also caused two deaths when used to colour a dessert in 1860.
Many colour additives had never been tested for toxicity or other adverse effects. Historical records show that injuries, even deaths, resulted from tainted colorants. In 1851, about 200 people were poisoned in England, 17 of them fatally, directly as a result of eating adulterated lozenges.In 1856, mauveine, the first synthetic colour, was developed by Sir William Henry Perkin and by the turn of the century, unmonitored color additives had spread through Europe and the United States in all sorts of popular foods, including ketchup, mustard, jellies, and wine.

Luckily, today both chemical and natural colourants are tested for safety. European Union (EU) legislation requires most additives used in foods to be labelled clearly in the list of ingredients, with their function, followed by either their name or E number. An E number means that it has passed safety tests and has been approved for use here and in the rest of the EU.

Of course that won’t apply now so we can all be poisoned 🙂

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Today I decided to play with the food colours I got,instead of doing research and stuff, it wasn’t as easy! I had a glass tank of water, an eye dropper, and my camera set on the burst mode, but getting the focus, exposure and aperture right was a right clart on, and I didn’t quite make it, but these are the best of a bad bunch. Also different colours have different viscosities and densities, the blue was hopeless, just splatted into a fuzzy cloud, whereas the green was just blobs on a string. The 2 top left were supposed to be red but look orange, but I think they were the best ones, anyway, it was fun to do.

FCC

and this is how it was done

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Day 242~366

Colour blindness, also known as colour vision deficiency, is the decreased ability to see colour or differences in colour. Colour blindness can make some educational activities difficult. Buying fruit, picking clothing, and reading traffic lights can also be more challenging. Problems, however, are generally minor and most people adapt. People with total colour blindness may also have decreased visual acuity.

The most common cause of colour blindness is due to a fault in the development of one or more of the three sets of colour sensing cones in the eye. Males are more likely to be colour blind than females as the genes responsible for the most common forms of colour blindness are on the X chromosome. As females have two X chromosomes, a defect in one is typically compensated for by the other, while males only have one X chromosome. Colour blindness can also result from physical or chemical damage to the eye, optic nerve, or parts of the brain. Red-green colour blindness is the most common form, followed by blue-yellow colour blindness and total colour blindness. Red-green colour blindness affects up to 8% of males and 0.5% of females of Northern European descent. The ability to see colour also decreases in old age. Being colour blind may make people ineligible for certain jobs in certain countries. This may include pilot, train driver, and armed forces. The effect of colour blindness on artistic ability; however, is controversial. The ability to draw appears to be unchanged and a number of famous artists are believed to have been color blind.

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Day 241~366

A colouring book is a type of book containing line art to which a reader may add colour using crayons, coloured pencils, marker pens, paint or other artistic media. Traditional colouring books and colouring pages are printed on paper or card. Some colouring books have perforated edges so their pages can be removed from the books and used as individual sheets. Others may include a story line and so are intended to be left intact.

Paint books and colouring books emerged in the United States as part of the “democratization of art” process, inspired by a series of lectures by British artist Joshua Reynolds, and the works of Swiss educator Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi and his student Friedrich Fröbel. Many educators concluded that all, regardless of background, students stood to benefit from art education as a means of enhancing their conceptual understanding of the tangible, developing their cognitive abilities, and improving skills that would be useful in finding a profession, as well as for the children’s spiritual edification.The McLoughlin Brothers are credited as the inventors of the colouring book, when, in the 1880s, they produced The Little Folks’ Painting Book, in collaboration with Kate Greenaway. They continued to publish colouring books until the 1920s, when the McLoughlin Brothers became part of the Milton Bradley Company.

(info from Wiki)

Had the grandkids over today, and as they were colouring in, I thought yay! there’s my topic for today!

Cal & Matty
Cal & Matty

Liddy, Cal & Livvy
Liddy, Cal & Livvy

Liddy eating the crayon box, Livvy and Cal colouring in.
Liddy eating the crayon box, Livvy and Cal colouring in.