Ormesby Hall – March 2019 -Part 2

PART 1 HISTORY HERE This week we are going to have a wander around the house. Sophie and I thought it was a bit like a tardis, as it seemed to have far more rooms than the outside appearance would have you think. You can see examples of  bold Palladian plasterwork and the more delicate neo-classical plasterwork ceilings in the drawing and dining rooms. Firstly the padded doorway.  This was installed by James Stovin Pennyman (1830-96) to help prevent the sounds of conversation disturbing the household  – he worked in York Lunatic Asylum so it’s possibly where he got that…

Ormesby Hall & St.Cuthberts Church March 2019 – part 1

Ormesby Hall is one of the National Trusts smaller properties. Barely a Stately Home, more of an historic house really, but Sophie and I don’t mind small, and the place was surprisingly interesting. Shall we commence with the history bit? (Rhetoric question, gotta be done 🙂 ) *Long post alert ~ get the kettle on* The History Bit The Estate of Ormesby has been around since before the Norman conquest, and possibly takes its name from Orme who was a tenant thereabouts registered in the Domesday Book.  The Hall has a long history with the Pennyman family and was acquired…

Seaton Delaval Hall~ Feb 2019 ~ Part 2

Part 1 HERE The marble floor in the great hall was open to the elements after the fire of 1822,the slabs were loose and the underneath screed worn away. They have all been uplifted, the screed replaced, and the tiles put back in their original position. The cracked ones have been bonded back together with resin adhesives mixed with pigment and stainless steel dowels have been added to give them strength. Some were too damaged and had to be replaced, but they managed to find Carrera Marble and black limestone that seems to match the originals closely. There are 3…

Seaton Delaval Hall – February 2019

*longish post alert, cup of tea time!* The Potted History Bit Seaton Delaval has not got the happiest of histories. The estate had belonged to the Delaval family since the Norman conquest in the 11th century.  By 1717 the mansion was owned by Sir John Delaval who was in severe financial difficulties, so he sold it to his rather rich kinsman, Admiral George Delaval.  George was from a minor branch of the Delaval family, from Northumberland, and his father had left him a legacy of £100 when he died, (about £11,000 in todays money) which he went on to convert…

The Art of Newcastle ~Jan 2019 ~ part 4

After lunch in the Biscuit Factory, we went off to see the Laing Art Gallery. On the way, we came across a little church hall and as you can see from the sign on the right (which I completely missed in the photo!) had an art exhibition. Well, we came for art, so decided to do a detour and see what was going on. It turned out to be a one-woman exhibition by one of the church’s congregation. and this was the artist Her arty bits were interesting, with lots of cut and folded canvasses but I don’t think I’d have…

The Art of Newcastle ~ The Biscuit Factory ~ Jan 2019

The UK’s largest independent commercial art, craft & design gallery set in the heart of Newcastle’s cultural quarter A commercial art gallery, café, and restaurant converted from a former biscuit factory which was operated by the Gibson family between 1860 and 1870. It has four floors, two of which were submerged when the street level was raised and these now serve as basement studios which are available for artists to rent. The gallery has everything, paintings, sculptures, ceramics, glass, textiles, furniture, and jewelry!  So much to see. As you walk in the space is clean and airy and nicely set out…

The Art of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne – Jan 2019

Back in January Sophie and I decided to visit a couple of the art galleries in Newcastle, The Biscuit Factory –  the biggest commercial art, craft and design gallery in the UK, and The Laing, home to an internationally important collection of art, focusing on British oil paintings, watercolours, ceramics, silver, and glassware. But before we get to the galleries, we must get off the metro at Central station and walk to Ouseburn, there’s plenty of photo ops along the way.  We get to the crossing over the central motorway, and before the crossing, we see The Oxford. The Oxford…

Shrewsbury ~ November 2018 ~ part 2

Today we are going to look at some of the listed buildings in Shrewsbury, most built between the late 14th and late 16th centuries.               Some shots now from the Rollei SL35 with a roll of Kodak Portra in it.           Stay tooned, we’re not done yet 🙂

Shrewsbury ~ November 2018 ~ part 1

A little break from our North Eastern adventures, as Phil and I went off to Shrewsbury to a model show Phil wanted to attend, and we took an extra day there for me to wander around Shrewsbury and take some photos of course. Shrewsbury is a market town, on the River Severn, 9 miles from the border with Wales.It has a largely unspoilt medieval street plan and over 660 listed buildings, including several examples of timber framing from the 15th and 16th centuries, so I knew it would be a fab place to photograph. The (potted) History Bit Originally the…