Arbeia Roman Fort & Museum~part 2

Part 1 HERE The reconstructed Roman Barracks show how the soldiers lived at the time when the fort was in use.  The first room you come to shows how the barracks are actually built, daub and wattle on a wicker frame. The rest of the rooms show the soldiers home life. The commanding officers house is really well done. Many of the local schools have day trips to the fort, and whilst I was there a group were in getting some bootcamp training for legionnaires. The kids loved it. This week the Fort has been awarded £150,000 funding boost for…

Fraggle report ~ Arbeia Roman Fort & Museum, Sept 2016, part 1

The History bit…. The ancient Romans certainly left their mark across the world.  Hadrian’s Wall was a defensive fortification in the Roman province of Britannia, begun in 122 AD in the reign of the emperor Hadrian. It ran from the banks of the River Tyne near the North Sea to the Solway Firth on the Irish Sea, and was the northern limit of the Roman Empire, immediately north of which were the lands of the northern Ancient Britains. The Roman fort at Arbeia once guarded the entrance to the river Tyne and served as a supply centre, receiving goods from across the North Sea and along the east coast to supply…

Day 266~366

100 days left now 🙂 Quinquereme is (apparently) an absorbing nautical dice game of strategy and chance,of Ancient Rome. The instructions are quite mind boggling, so I will spare you the details, but basically each player has 3 throws of the dice at each turn, and keep some dice back each time to try and complete a category. The categories are all named after roman ships and whoever has the highest score at the end of 12 turns, wins. Although the game in it’s original format has disappeared from current play, many variations exist throughout the world, probably as a…

Day 264~366

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. The use of Roman numerals continued long after the decline of the Roman Empire. From the 14th century on, Roman numerals began to be replaced in most contexts by the more convenient Hindu-Arabic numerals; however, this process was gradual, and the use of Roman numerals persists in some minor applications to this day. The numbers 1 to 10 are…