Bamburgh Castle Revisted ~ August 2019 ~ 2

Part 1 HERE After a good wander around the grounds we went to visit the museums. The first museum we got to was the Armstrong & Aviation museum, which houses some of the stuff that Armstrong produced for WW2, and some stuff from WW1. I’m sorry to say I didn’t take notes or many photo’s in this museum, I’m not sure why it didn’t float my boat,  however there was a really nice vintage car that I liked. We also visited the Archaeology Museum and saw some nice bling that they had dug up. The pieces were incredibly small, but…

St Cuthberts Church ~ March 2019

The History bit The Domesday Book, is a manuscript record of the “Great Survey” of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. Both Ormesby Hall, and St Cuthbert’s church, are mentioned in this record and listed as belonging to ‘Orme’, to whose name the suffix ‘by’ (the Viking word for habitation or dwelling place) was added to make Ormesby.  There has been then, a church on this site for at least 933 years, maybe more. Unfortunately the church as it stands today has been largely rebuilt between 1875 and 1907 to…

Shrewsbury ~ November 2018 ~ part 1

A little break from our North Eastern adventures, as Phil and I went off to Shrewsbury to a model show Phil wanted to attend, and we took an extra day there for me to wander around Shrewsbury and take some photos of course. Shrewsbury is a market town, on the River Severn, 9 miles from the border with Wales.It has a largely unspoilt medieval street plan and over 660 listed buildings, including several examples of timber framing from the 15th and 16th centuries, so I knew it would be a fab place to photograph. The (potted) History Bit Originally the…

Seaham ~ part 3 ~ St.Mary’s

The Church of St.Mary The Virgin, is on the list of the top 20 oldest churches in Britain.  It’s also the only surviving building of the original Saxon Village of Seaham Harbour. (now just Seaham). It was founded by King Æthelstan in 930AD and has 7th C late Anglo Saxon masonry and early Norman masonry in its nave, and a 13th-century chancel and west tower.  Over the 16th-century porch door is a late 18th-century sundial with an unusual verse, now illegible, which begins: “The natural clockwork by the mighty one wound up at first and ever since has gone…” which…

Fraggle Report~St.Albans Cathedral~ May 2018

*Attention span warning*– long post requiring 5 minutes reading ability. 😀   Back in May, regular readers may remember, Phil and I went down memory lane to ST. Albans in Hertfordshire. Neither of us had ever visited the Cathedral before when we lived and worked there, so we made up for that, new memories :). The History Bit. Maybe. Ok, this is how it goes, give or take the odd legend.  Alban lived in what was known as Verulamium back in the 3rd or 4th century. ( see the post on that HERE).  Around that time, Christians were being persecuted by…

Sunderland ~ November 2017

Sophie lives in Sunderland and had spotted the signs for the Diwali Festival so we decided that would be a cool thing to attend with our cameras. We knew parking would be a bit of a nightmare so we  walked to the Festival which was being held at the National Glass Centre. Of course I took pictures along the way, so before we get to the festival, this post will be of our walk on the way. The old Fire Station on Station Road West is a wonderful Edwardian building, with immense heritage value and importance. It has lain derelict…

St.Pauls Church and Monastery~ November 2017

Following on from visiting Bede’s Museum and the Anglo~Saxon farm and village  Sophie and I walked down the road to visit St.Pauls Church and Monastery ruins.  The monastery site is under the care of English Heritage, but the church is still in use. A bit more history  St Paul’s Church and Monastery was built on land given by King Ecgfrith of Northumbria in AD681.It was founded by Benedict Biscop, who seven years ealier had built the church and monastery of St. Peter’s at Wearmouth (Sunderland).The chancel of St. Paul’s is the original Saxon church, built as a separate chapel and possibly…

Jarrow Hall, Anglo Saxon village ~ Part 2

Part 1 HERE After the museum we went out to the anglo~saxon farm and village. Home to curly-coated pigs, Dexter bullocks, sheep, goats, ducks, chickens and more, this 11-acre site houses rare breeds which are the closest possible representatives of the animals that would have been present 1300 years ago. Generally smaller than those we see today, these breeds give a feel for what animals would have been like during Bede’s time. Anglo-Saxons used the bird species for their meat, feathers and eggs; the eggs were not only eaten but used to mix inks used by monks to illustrate their manuscripts. Cattle…

Jarrow Hall, Anglo Saxon village and Bede Museum ~ November 2017 ~ Part 1

The History Bit Known as The Venerable Bede,(AD 673-735,) Bede was an author, scholar, skilled linguist and translator who also composed works on astronomical timekeeping and the motions of the sun, Earth and Moon. He was widely regarded as the ‘father of English history’ as his most famous work, The Ecclesiastical History of the English People is one of the most important original references on Anglo-Saxon history. This work also played a key role in the development of an English national identity. He was an English monk who lived at the Abbey Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, Wearmouth-Jarrow, a double…