Raby Castle ~ August 2018 ~ Interior Part 1

The History and external shots of the grounds can be accessed thusly:- EXTERIOR….Part 1 HERE.  Part 2 HERE. Part 3 HERE Now we get to the inside of the castle and will start off in the Entrance Hall, described as “one of the boldest conceptions of its age and the first truly dramatic interior of the Gothic revival” due to its elegant Gothic vaulting.  I’m not sure why, but it was decided to construct a carriageway through the castle, presume they were too lazy to ride around the outside. John Carr of York got the job and did it by…

Seaham ~ part 3 ~ St.Mary’s

The Church of St.Mary The Virgin, is on the list of the top 20 oldest churches in Britain.  It’s also the only surviving building of the original Saxon Village of Seaham Harbour. (now just Seaham). It was founded by King Æthelstan in 930AD and has 7th C late Anglo Saxon masonry and early Norman masonry in its nave, and a 13th-century chancel and west tower.  Over the 16th-century porch door is a late 18th-century sundial with an unusual verse, now illegible, which begins: “The natural clockwork by the mighty one wound up at first and ever since has gone…” which…

Fraggle Report~ Saltwell Towers & Park~April 2017~part 1

The History Bit Saltwell Park is a Victorian park in Gateshead, Tyne and Wear, England. Opened in 1876, the park was designed by Edward Kemp and incorporates the mansion and associated grounds of the Saltwellgate estate owner, William Wailes, who sold his estate to Gateshead Council for £35,000. Upon opening, it became known as “The People’s Park”. The park was expanded in 1920 when the council purchased the adjacent gardens to the Saltwell Grove estate and added these to the park. This extended the park’s total size to 55 acres. Towards the end of the 20th century, the park had…

Fraggle Report~ Tynemouth Murder Mystery Tour~part 1~ August 2016

Back in August Sophie got given a Murder Mystery leaflet about Tynemouth.  It involved following clues that would give you a persons name, or something that could be used as a weapon, eliminating the ones we found to be left with the name of the murderer and weapon used.  We had to walk all around Tynemouth to find the clues, took pictures along the way and solved the mystery.  It took us all day and we learned some history too. Tynemouth’s history dates back to an Iron Age settlement and its strategic position on a headland over-looking the mouth of…

The York report 9 ~ York Minster Interior

Finally got to the last post on York, and this time inside York Minster.       York as a whole, and particularly the minster, have a long tradition of creating beautiful stained glass. Some of the stained glass in York Minster dates back to the 12th century. The Minster’s records show that much of the glass (white or coloured) came from Germany. Because of the extended time periods during which the glass was installed, different types of glazing and painting techniques which evolved over hundreds of years are visible in the different windows. Approximately two million individual pieces of glass make up the…

The York Report 8 ~gargoyles and carvings.

I love gargoyles and York Minster has a fine collection so I took some photo’s of them. When I researched what gargoyles are all about on Wiki, I found that really they are just a form of plumbing!  “a gargoyle is a carved or formed grotesque with a spout designed to convey water from a roof and away from the side of a building, thereby preventing rainwater from running down masonry walls and eroding the mortar between. Architects often used multiple gargoyles on buildings to divide the flow of rainwater off the roof to minimize the potential damage from a rainstorm. A trough is cut in the back…

The York Report 7~York Minster exterior

York Minster, the 2nd largest Gothic Cathedral in Northern Europe. And what a beauty, I could spend many happy hours in this stunning place. But first a potted history 🙂 Starting out as a wooden building in 627 AD (1388 yrs ago!!) in the 630’s it was rebuilt in stone then fell into disrepair by 670. A chap called St.Wilfred took over and repaired and renewed it. Then in 741 it was burnt down, and consequently rebuilt with even more impressive stonework. The church and the entire area then passed through the hands of numerous invaders, and its history is obscure…

a little catching up to do

Haven’t been taking many photo’s of late, have been thwarted by the flu, the weather, life in general.  I did manage to sit and have lunch by the sea one afternoon, and took a series of people walking past the gap in the dunes, which amused me as I was sitting in the car at the time, had a Warhol moment 🙂   On one of my client visits I went by Ludworth Tower, I have shot this before but had another go as it may just fall down one day though it was built in 1422, so nearly 600…

Gothic Exercising.

The theme for my photography challenge this weekend was ‘anything gothic’! I acquired some gothic jewellery dirt cheap on amazon during the week with a view to photographing it fetchingly against some black velvet or whatever plush fabric I could come up with, but by Friday had decided it would be much more ‘gothic’ to wear it and shoot it in a graveyard. I worry about myself sometimes. Anyway it became apparent that I would need help mainly to get the bloody hand piece and the gothic choker done up as I couldn’t manage it myself :D! Hubby was working…