South Shields Food Fair ~ May 2018

Sophie and I love a good food fair, most of the stalls have free tasters which we take advantage of whenever possible, we buy stuff you can’t really get in Tesco’s and have a cool lunch from one of the stalls.  I love to unleash the camera on some unsuspecting people for a change too. Back in May, we went to the one at Bent’s Park on the seafront and were not disappointed with the wares available.

Say Cheese!!! (The orange & whisky cheese was yummy!)

 

Interesting chocolate. Forgot to buy some :/

 

These otter go well with tonic!

 

The garlic lady. (Bought a peeler/mincer/storage jar from here. 🙂

 

and the rest!! 🙂

 

The Tempted

 

The Temptress

 

Making friends

 

Buy Two…

 

The War on Mundane begins

That’ll do for part 1 I think, don’t want you falling asleep.

Stay tooned for Part 2 coming soon to a screen near you. 🖥

 

Day 304~366

“Whatcha doing Fraggle?”
‘I’m making soul cakes for my photo for the Sunday Challenge group, it’s Halloween tomorrow and that’s the theme.’
“What happens to them after the photo?”
‘I’ll give them to the trick or treaters tomorrow night’
“Can I have one?”
‘If you’re nice to me’
“Forget it!”
*sigh*

day304-2w

and my shot for the challenge

day304w

Day 229~366

The meaning of colour 6~Pink
Pink is a combination of the color red and white, a hue that can be described as a tint. It can range from berry (blue-based) pinks to salmon (orange-based) pinks. Its symbolism is complex and its popularity is subject to so many influences.
Depending on your age and culture, you may remember pink Cadillacs, pink flamingos, Pink Floyd, the Pink Panther, and the pink triangles of the Third Reich (which were used to identify male homosexuals).
In almost every culture, one stereotype emerges: pink is associated with girls, blue with boys. Unfortunately, there is no consensus of opinion on its origin.

The origin of the English term “pink” is as valuable as any discourse on symbolism. Here are some interesting analyses:

In English, the word “pink” could be derived from the Dutch flower pinken dating back to 1681. The flower’s name could have originally been “pink eye” or “small eye.” Another possibility is the verb “to pink” – to prick or cut around the edges, as with pinking shears. The jagged petals of the flower looked as though they had been cut, thus explaining why it became known as the “pink.” (Jean Heifetz, When Blue Meant Yellow, p 110)

In colloquial language, to be “tickled pink” describes a state of joy, a “pink slip” is a notice that you’ve been fired from your job, to be “in the pink” suggest good fortune and health, and a “pinko” is a person who is extremely liberal, a socialist or a communist.

Day229aw

 

Day 109~366

My chocoholic hubby’s stash. He likes the red ones best :).

(ok, the not red ones are mine 🙂 )

day109w

sometimes you make a picture and hear a song…

Day 76~366

Out of all the square treats so far this month, tonight is my favourite. 🙂 After Eight mint chocolate thins were one of my Mum’s favourites too. Invented by Brian Sollitt they came on the  market in 1962 and were supposed to be after dinner chocolates.  Mum didn’t have dinner parties, but she’d get a box now and then at a weekend and we’d sit at night in her double bed with music on and reading books and stuff ourselves on the little square yummies. It’s the little things….

day76w