Wallington Walled Garden ~ February 2019

Regular readers might remember my posts of the wonderful interior at Wallington Hall back in October 2018, if not, check it out HERE if you like. In February Sophie and I revisited the walled gardens as we had heard about the field of crocuses/crocusi/croci (whatever plural you prefer) on display. On our way to the garden, we took in the view across the fields from Wallington Hall. There was a ‘plant some snowdrops’ thing going on where the public could help the gardeners populate areas with snowdrops, but there were quite a few parents and kids doing it, and we…

Seaton Delaval Hall~ Feb 2019 ~ Part 2

Part 1 HERE The marble floor in the great hall was open to the elements after the fire of 1822,the slabs were loose and the underneath screed worn away. They have all been uplifted, the screed replaced, and the tiles put back in their original position. The cracked ones have been bonded back together with resin adhesives mixed with pigment and stainless steel dowels have been added to give them strength. Some were too damaged and had to be replaced, but they managed to find Carrera Marble and black limestone that seems to match the originals closely. There are 3…

Seaton Delaval Hall – February 2019

*longish post alert, cup of tea time!* The Potted History Bit Seaton Delaval has not got the happiest of histories. The estate had belonged to the Delaval family since the Norman conquest in the 11th century.  By 1717 the mansion was owned by Sir John Delaval who was in severe financial difficulties, so he sold it to his rather rich kinsman, Admiral George Delaval.  George was from a minor branch of the Delaval family, from Northumberland, and his father had left him a legacy of £100 when he died, (about £11,000 in todays money) which he went on to convert…

Rock & Craster & Dunstanburgh Castle

After our morning in Newbiggin Sophie and I went up to visit Craster, and on the way stopped off in Rock at a cafe Sophie found on Trip Advisor. The owner there was lovely and had a good chat with us.  He had 2 gorgeous sheepdogs, and the cafe is dog-friendly with an area outside for dogs to run around in.  Good food too. Then we drove on to Craster which is famous for its kippers.   We walked up to see the castle, the sea was being quite dramatic. The sky was lovely The castle was built between 1313…

Cragside ~ Nov 2018 ~ part 3

Part 1 HERE.      Part 2 HERE We only had a couple of hours if that before darkness was due to descend, so we drove the 6 mile route around the estate, but stopped for a wander here and there when we came across something interesting. Our first stop was the quarry from whence the stones came to build Cragside. It’s full of rhododendrons in summer so we will be returning then. Next stop was a short walk up to a lake bed that was drained but still had its boathouse. On the way I spotted some weird lichen/fungi…

Cragside Nov 2018 ~ part 2

Part 1 HERE Although it was a bit nippy it was a blue sky day, so when we came out of the house we went for a wander around the estate. Straight out into the courtyard and then down a steep path to a bridge     Looking back at the side of the house   Over the bridge and to our left is another little bridge and a path through the grounds. It was lunchtime however so we turned left under the bridge   and off we went to lunch. We checked out the shop afterwards   and as…

Cragside ~November 18th 2018

Cragside, what a wonderful day out we had there. It’s a National Trust property now but didn’t start out that way. I think we’ll have a bit of History and edumacation before we have a look at some photos. The History Bit Let me first introduce you to William Armstrong, 1st Baron Armstrong, for it is he who built Cragside as a family home. He was born on 26 November 1810 in Newcastle upon Tyne, the son of a corn merchant. Trained as a solicitor, he moved to London before he was twenty. Returning to Newcastle, in 1835 he met and…

Wallington ~ October 2018 ~ part 3

Part 1 HERE.  Part 2. HERE    It was Halloween weekend at the time of our visit, and the staff in the cafe had made the most of it The first part you come to on entering the house is the spectacular central hall. The original open courtyard was roofed over in the 1850s and the Pre-Raphaelite artist William Bell Scott created eight large wall paintings capturing 2,000 years of local history.   one of the amazing wall panels by Scott There are some great works of art throughout Wallington, and one of my favourites is what I think of as an…

Wallington Hall and Grounds ~ October 2018 ~part 1

Sophie and I had a lovely autumnal outing to Wallington Hall back in October, chilly, but with blue skies and autumn leaves and colours everywhere.  Of course the hall has a history, so that’s up first. The History Bit Wallington is a country house and gardens located about 12 miles west of Morpeth, Northumberland, England, near the village of Cambo. It has been owned by the National Trust since 1942 after it was donated complete with the estate and farms by Sir Charles Philips Trevelyan, the first donation of its kind. It is a Grade I listed building. The estate…