365~June 6th ~ 12th

We are in another ‘colour’ week, although black & white are not so much colours in my mind, but no matter, I like doing B&W stuff. I was quite looking forward to it but it turned out to have an annoyance factor of at least 7 on a scale of 1 to 10. So I’m not all that happy with some of my shots, but, every day’s a school day so onwards ever onwards.

Day 157 ~ Quality. ~ The definition of quality is “the standard of something as measured against other things of a similar kind; the degree of excellence of something.” Or, “a distinctive attribute or characteristic possessed by someone or something.” Today, I strongly encourage you to use the second idea of just focusing on a distinctive attribute or characteristic possessed by your subject. This prompt is not a requirement to post your best quality image.  I challenge you to really think about what quality says to you today. 

Straight in with an AFAC (airy fairy abstract concept) prompt so that wasn’t the best start for me. I’d rather have done the first definition, plenty of quality gear in our gaff, like extra-virgin olive oil, or lindt chocolates, but no, she wanted the quality of a subject. I just could not get my head around it so instead focussed on ‘quality time’ which is kind of AFAC, so this is me and Phil having quality time. 🙄

Day 158 ~ Roadside. ~ One of the things I really like about a 365 project is that it gets me out exploring the beautiful city of Ottawa that I’ve called home for the last 4 years.  I’ve also found myself on countless roadtrips exploring the surrounding countryside, villages, and towns, as well.  It’s been an awesome way for me to learn more about my new home. When I go out exploring, I’m often surprised by what I find along the roadside.  We were out touring around downtown recently and I saw the unique bike structure near the parliament buildings.  It was being used for advertising.  I had to grab a photo of it as I thought it was kind of cool.  When processing, I converted it to black and white to fit in with this week’s theme. Show us what crazy, unique, or interesting things you find on the roadside as you go about your travels today.

Sigh. Well at least it was specific, but no-one round here leaves crazy, cool interesting things on the roadside, though there are some dodgy looking motors on the wrong side of the tracks area of Wardley. I remembered Wardley has one of the announcement-of-where-you-are stones places tend to have up here, so I walked up to photograph that instead. In days of yore Wardley was a mining village, so it’s stone has a carved miner’s lamp decoration, though the lamp portrayed looks like a Marsault lamp invented by Jean Marsaut, a French mining engineer. Wouldn’t have been used here in the North East as they used a Geordie lamp- invented by George Stephenson. Oh well.

Day 159 ~ Plenty. ~ Have you noticed that converting a photo to B&W can really make the details pop? Past their prime flowers are a favorite subject for me to photograph. Part of the charm is the fading color… but, when you convert to B&W your eye really goes to the tiniest of details. This faded daisy has plenty of delightful details. Each individual petal has a charm of its own. The withering center with delicate puff is spectacular. Find a subject today that represents plenty and convert it to B&W. It can have a lot of detail, represent a feeling of plenty, or any other way the word speaks to you.

Another AFAC although you’d think there were plenty of ‘plenties’ in the world. Another thing that annoys me is having too much to choose from, and it’s hard to make up my mind. I have plenty of clothes/flowers/boots/CD’s etc etc etc, but in the end I went with a dandelion. Plenty of seeds, I thought, though Connie tells me each seed represents a dream, so plenty of those too.

Day 160 ~ Paper. ~ White can be a difficult color to photograph.  Doing so requires careful attention to the “temperature” of your image by adjusting the white balance setting.  Today is a good day to play with adjusting your white balance manually.  I generally have my WB set to 5000K, a good right in the middle setting.  To determine the white balance setting in a particular image, photograph something in your scene that is white.  Since today’s prompt is paper, you can also place a white piece of paper in the scene for a test shot.  You want that piece of paper to be a true white in your photo.  Adjust your white balance either up or down to achieve the white you want.  Temperature can be edited in post-processing, but it sure is nice to get it as close as possble in camera!  To understand light color and Kelvin, take a trip to the lightbulb aisle at your local home improvement store.  That is the quickest way to see what is meant by the various numbers! See what you can do with shooting a black and white image in color.

Well today was a work day and this afternoon a dental appointment so I didn’t have time to fanny on. Ergo I ignored most of that, the prompt was Paper, not white paper and I certainly was not going to traipse off to B&Q’s lighting section, still not sure how that would help matters at all. I used my origami skill set instead.

Day 161 ~ Capable. ~ Capable – having the ability, fitness, or quality necessary to do or achieve a specified thing. I think I am capable, but I am move (I think she means ‘more’ not ‘move’) capable with my husband by my side;  together we make a good team.  We have been together for 42 years, have four grown children, and have weathered life together as you can see by the wrinkles. How do you manage to be capable?  Remember it is black and white week!

Seriously??? Can you hear me groaning as I am just thinking about how much this one annoyed me. This is the Mother of all AFACs. How do I manage to be capable of what?? You can’t just be capable without an of something attached. Pfft. If I list all the things that a human being is capable of, and me in particular, we will be here until forever. Well you won’t no doubt, you’ll step aside from the vehicle and move on the next blog. I had smoke coming out of my facial orifices for this one. Phil couldn’t help either as he knows I’m multi-capable and so is he. I checked out other peoples offerings on instagram, not much inspiration, an out of focus cat, someone’s daughter (badly composed) a chopped down tree stump. Sigh. Anyway I got on with the laundry whilst racking my brain (no it DOESN’T have a W in front of it in real life grammar) and hung out some clothes on my dryer, which promptly collapsed when one of the side supports snapped. Phil and I propped it up on garden chairs and I concluded that it’s good to be capable of improvisation in a crisis. Sorted.

Day 162 ~ Ink. ~ Ink day!  Who wants to try a new trick?  Don’t worry, “Ink in Water Photography” is very simple and fun although it can be a bit messy! Honestly, you don’t need any special equipment and this can be done with a cell phone. I took this picture using a large vase, some white foam core, a desk lamp, some ink from a fountain pen, an eye dropper, my camera, and a tripod. If this does not tickle your fancy, no problem!  Show us ink!  Pens, tattoos, books, typewriters……..Have fun!

Well thank the deity of your choice that Mrs. Cocktail Dress came up with a bonafide specific task! She is my new fave prompt giver. I’d done the old ink in water shots in the past, so decided to go with tattoos as Phil has a couple of artistic ones, but they just didn’t work in black and white, so I got out my fountain pen and did one of my calligraphy shots instead. Sorry to say my calligraphy skills are a bit ropey as I haven’t done any proper work in calligraphy for years, but it’s inspired me to get a special pen for it for future and I’ll be practicing my alphabets, so next time I need to do it I can impress you with it’s gorgeousness.

Day 163 ~ Richness. ~ I hope you have enjoyed color week! I always hate to see it end! We sure have explored Black and White photography in a variety of fun ways!  As you go through your day think about the richness your image will hold without the distraction of color. Consider highlighting patterns and textures, light and shadows, people and things.  You can shoot in color and then convert to B&W or if your camera has a B&W mode give this feature a try. It is a great way to train your eye. There is much richness in the details, so let’s show them off today! 

Another AFAC but one that I didn’t have trouble with. Winnie has great patterns and textures and I caught her sitting in a box with the light on her face and her body in shade, and she lends herself beautifully to black and white, being a grey/black/white cat. Also she enriches our lives immeasurably as does Lord Vincent, it’s my fave shot this week. Finally winning at black and white! 😃

So there ends the black and white week. Starting today we’re on another composition technique week, and this time we are ‘isolating our subjects’. I’ve had a look through the prompts, 🥴 Stay tooned!

Midnight Snow

For three days it rained non stop, right up to 11pm last night. Then we went to the kitchen about 11.30pm to make a cup of tea to take to bed and through the window we saw

Snow

It’s been a long time since we saw ‘proper’ snow and we ran to the conservatory and opened the door and stood watching, as big clumps of snowflakes floated to the ground, and stayed. It made us smile and wonder. The world was quiet all of a sudden, the traffic noises deadened in the whitening. I grabbed my phone to take some pictures, but it gives an other worldy orange filter to everything

So I took some from all our windows and converted them to black and white

We spent a long time watching it, and were glad that we could enjoy it and not have to go anywhere in the morning. But we got up this morning and it had gone. It left us as swiftly as it arrived, with only a vestige of it’s former self on the lawns and shed roofs. We sighed, our winter wonderland was a fleeting visitor, and I’m glad we didn’t miss it.

Newcastle – Sept 2019 – people

Just some people I spotted on our walk around Gateshead & Newcastle.

At Venice Beach 🙂
The force is with them
Geordie Shore
02
Up
It wasn’t that bad!
Liquid Lunch
Three Hens
Walking Dudettes
Wait-ers
Party Girls
Living out of a suitcase.

All pictures embiggenable with a little click

An album of all the Newcastle pictures can be found HERE

Stay tooned for our next adventure. 🙂

A Geordie – China connection.

After our washed out morning at Dunston Staiths,we crossed the River and went to visit St.Johns Cemetary. We came across some Chinese tombstones, not a usual find when we’re traipsing through graveyards. So I did a little research…..

Back we go to the late 1800’s and to the later part of the Qing dynasty, which, as I’m sure you all know, was presided over by the Empress Dowager Cixi, a formidable and capable lady who had a fascinating life, having started out as a lowly concubine, but ending up as head Missis to the Emperor.  The Chinese had four modernized navies during this period, and the Beiyang Fleet dated back to 1871, when four ships from the southern provinces were shifted north to patrol the northern waters. Initially considered to be the weakest of the four navies, that all changed when one of the most trusted vassals of the Empress, a chap named Li Hongzhang, decided to allot  the majority of naval funds to the Beiyang Fleet thereby making it the largest of China’s  navies.

What has all this got to do with Newcastle I hear you ask, so I shall tell you. You may remember my visit to Cragside last year, which was built by the engineer William Armstrong. You can read about him on that post HERE for it was he who had built a shipyard at Elswick in Newcastle, on the River Tyne, and Li Hongzhang populated his new navy with ships from Germany and Britain. Two of these were built at the Elswick yard, steel protected cruisers, fast and with big guns, the Zhiyuan, and the Jingyuan.

The Elswick Shipyard Mid 1890’s.

Zhiyuan

Jingyuan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A delegation was sent to Newcastle from the Beiyang Navy.  Sadly, 5 of the sailors died of an unspecified illness, whilst waiting to sail the ships back to their base in China. Yuan Peifu, Gu Shizhong, Lian Jinyuan, Chen Shoufu and Chen Chengkui.  They were buried in St Johns Cemetery in Elswick, and over the past 100 years or so their tombstones had deteriorated, collapsed, and sunk into the ground.

Crew of the Zhiyuan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 2016 a student from the Royal College of Art in London posted photos of the cracked tombstones online and quickly attracted the attention of the China Foundation for Cultural Heritage Conservation, a nonprofit organization. The president of the foundation, Li Xiaojie launched a global crowdfunding thingy and raised the money to pay for the tombstones to be restored.

Zhang Rong was the engineer sent by the Foundation to fix the tombs. He flew to Newcastle and met with the council to have a conflab on how to go about it. “We went through each item line by line, trying to find common ground and iron out any differences,” Zhang said. “It was worth the time because we learned so much during the process, especially about improving our standards.” In China, repairing tombstones is quite basic, glue the pieces back together, whereas in Britain, you also have to insert steel rods to make sure they keep standing and don’t fall over on top of people.

Together with Joseph Richmond & Son Memorials, Zhang and his team completed the restoration of the tombstones in December 2018. The graves were originally purchased by the Chinese Government for £5 each, (equivalent to £5000 nowadays).  The Chinese didn’t have much foreign cash at the time, and this would have been a great sacrifice for them.

The rededication ceremony was in June 2019, with Chinese and Newcastlese dignitaries and the like all saying nice things about each other, which is kind of sweet.

“The five sailors can rest peacefully knowing that even after all these years, people back home still care about them. This is a project full of human warmth and love.”  said Li Xiaojie.

When China take over the world we up here will be alright I think 😊

Refs:- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beiyang_Fleet
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/world/2017-02/06/content_28118091.htm
http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-06/14/c_138144321.htm
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/china-watch/culture/chinese-graves-restored-in-newcastle/

Dunston Staiths – July 2019

On a wet day in July Sophie and I went to the outdoor market held once a month on Dunston Staiths.

 

The History Bit 

The Staiths are believed to be the largest timber structure in Europe, maybe the world, but who knows?  It is also a Grade II listed scheduled monument and is owned by registered charity Tyne and Wear Building Preservation Trust (TWBPT).  The structure is made of North American pitch pine timber, no longer available, from the once unlimited forest. Most of the timber used was 20 metres long, 14 inches deep and 14 inches wide. The total weight of timber is 3,200 tons. The Staithes are 526 metres long with 4 railway tracks, 6 loading berths (3 on each side), with two chutes to each berth.

The North East Railway Company opened the Staiths in 1893, and it’s purpose was to facilitate the loading of large quantities of coal from the Durham coal fields onto the waiting coal ships, (known as colliers) which then transported the coal to London and abroad.  At it’s peak, the coal industry  moved 5.5 million tons of coal each year from the staiths. Waggonways were used to transport the coal from the North Durham coal-fields, of which there were quite a few. The coal waggons were pushed by steam engines up the gradient, to the Staithes. It was a very skilled job to shunt the wagons onto the Staithes, as the driver worked “blind” from behind, and had to make sure they were on the right track. The men had their own signals, maybe a touch of a cap, or some other gesture, but there was nothing written down, so the driver had to depend on them. If he didn’t gauge the end of the track just right, the trucks could fall over the edge.

Once on the Staithes, and at the berths, the “teamers” and “trimmers” were waiting in the colliers to level the coal, as it came down the chutes, to keep the ship level. The empty wagons rolled back to the Railway siding by gravity. It was not a pleasant place to work, as it was noisy, oily and very, very, dirty. There were occasionally some very serious accidents, because of the poor lighting. They worked by candlelight until electricity arrived in 1930. Some of the men lost their limbs, some were crushed between the ship and the Staithes, however,  it was still considered a privilege to work there. Trimmer’s and teamer’s jobs were nearly always handed down from father to son, or some-one in the family. They were the “elite” of the Staithes, very well paid, as in 1930 they earned around £8 to £10 per week, I don’t think anyone knew how much they really earned, (not even the Tax Man).

Interesting factoid:- In 1912, a dug-out canoe was found at the West Dunston Staiths, it dated back to Neolithic times, (New Stone Age circa 5000 BC). Not sure where that ended up.

The coal industry declined at the end of the 19th century, and so too did the staiths, no longer needed, it fell into disrepair. In 1990 though, the Newcastle Garden Festival was held and extensive restoration work carried out, with the Staiths taking a leading role as a key installation with performance space and an art gallery.  But then a fire broke out in 2003 damaging the Staiths extensively, and it was put on English Heritages ‘at risk’ list. It has been subject to a few arson attacks too sadly.  Somehow the TWBPT raised the funds to recommence the restoration, which is still ongoing, and the Staiths is once more a visitor attracton, with a Saturday Market open once a month on a Saturday, which is when we visited.

So on with the show!

Firstly, on the menu..

who doesn’t love a Carpathian sausage?? 🙂

Not the biggest market really

Wine tasting always welcome!

Father and son disunion

The structure is quite amazing

We went topside to see what the view was like. Looking back towards Newcastle the fire damage was evident and that part was cordoned off.

Fire in the hole

Looking the other way, a sea fret was rolling up the river

It passed over, we got wet and then we got a better view.

It was a good spot for people watching

Mr.Text

Mrs Smile + 1

and it was a perfect day for umbrellas

Leopard print and bubble style

Spotty dotty

3 + hoody

We didn’t stay very long as the weather just kept getting worse, but did go and visit St James Cemetary nearby in the afternoon, which has some interesting gravestones. So stay tooned for that 🙂

all pictures by moi and you can embiggen them with a click.

Some more fascinating images of it  HERE   🙂

refs: http://www.dunstonstaiths.org.uk/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunston,_Tyne_and_Wear

Stephenson Heritage Railway – June 2019 – Part 3

Part 1 HERE  Part 2 HERE

After we finally gave up going for rides, we got to look around in the workshops,with the lovely gentlemen explaining things to us.

Painting

Explaining what’s to be done

Mr.Fixer

work in progress – This steam locomotive was built for the Ashington Coal Company in Northumberland in 1939 by Peckett & Sons, Bristol. The Ashington Coal Company had one of Britain’s most extensive colliery railways. For 30 years it hauled wagons of coal from the company’s pits, and also passenger trains for the miners.  In 1991 it was acquired by Stephenson Railway Museum and was given the additional name of Jackie Milburn in honour of the great Newcastle United footballer who grew up in Ashington.

Some fab old tool boxes in use

??? 🙂

They had had some Thomas the Tank faces made for the front of the big steam engines to make the kids smile, but the people who own Thomas the Tank wouldn’t let them use them, so they just hang in the workshop. I mean, what harm would it do really?

No bodies

‘Bait’ up here is Geordie for lunch

Lunch timer

Our lovely workshop guide.

They let you drive a train up and down a bit for £2 which was a bargain, and Sophie was definitely up for that!

Driving Instructions

choo-choo

We also had a look in the museum and around the outside.

 

Billy

Billy is one of the oldest locomotives in the world, built and designed by George Stephenson in 1816 and one of the most innovative transport systems of it’s day and was used for over 50 years.

The 401 – Thomas Burt

This locomotive is named after Thomas Burt, a miners’ leader from Northumberland who in 1874 became the first working man to be elected as an MP. Also known as Vulcan, the 401 was one of three built in 1951 at Stafford by W.G. Bagnall Ltd for the Steel Company of Wales.

So that ends our visit to Stephenson Heritage Museum.

All pictures are by me and embiggenable with a click.

There is an album with more pictures of it HERE

and their excellent website is HERE

Stay tooned for our next adventure, a revisit to Cragside to see the rhododendrons

 

Stephenson Heritage Railway – June 2019 – Part 2

Part 1 HERE

Sophie and I enjoyed the train ride so much we went on it twice 🙂 as the ticket covered you for as many goes as you liked.

Shabby chic

They are still renovating the carriages, so they do look a bit shabby, but it didn’t matter to us, it was easy to ignore that and imagine being in Brief Encounter 🙂

Of course we and all the other kids ignored that!

On the return journey we were just in normal class as someone got to our first class carriage before us (gits 😀 )

Good job we didn’t need to ‘go’

second class carriage

Tempting…..but didn’t 🙂

Scenes from the windows

Veritable Vegetation

Pizza thataway

Boy racer

Back at the station we said our thanks to the guard

and to the Station Master who was happy to pose for a photograph

and I couldn’t resist a sneaky shot of this little lad waiting his turn to go on the train

The wonder years

That’s it for today, but we haven’t finished with the railway, as we got to look around the work shop, and Sophie got to drive a train, so stay tooned for next time:)

 

Haydon Bridge Church

Haydon Bridge Church is hidden away in a copse of trees, up the side of a hill overlooking the little town of Haydon Bridge (pop. 2000) Yet again it is one of the places where those long suffering monks carting St.Cuthberts corpse around for a hundred years ended up to have a rest. (For more on ST.Cuthbert see HERE) .  There is a great deal of doubt as to when this little church was originally built; if the bones of St. Cuthbert did rest there, it must have been in existence before the saint found his last resting place in Durham Cathedral in 995.

If that’s the case, it was rebuilt in the Norman style round about AD 1190, with re-used Roman stones, possibly from nearby Hadrians wall. It was given to the monks of Hexam Abbey by the Lord of Langley, the landowner at that time.  The church was partly demolished, leaving only the chancel with the stones taken from it to build the new parish church in the village. It was then converted into a mortuary chapel before being restored in 1882.

We parked a little way down the other side of the hill where there’s a space my little car fits into, and there are lovely views all around.

Up the hill and there’s a gate to go through first

and then you walk through an amazing tunnel of Yew trees.

and then come into the grounds of the little church.

The door was open so we went in to have a look.

There are some lovely stained glass windows,

14th century window with stained glass in memory of Jane Routledge, who left a bequest of 20 pounds annually to spinsters or widows of Haydon chapelry.

The church organ is a Packard from Fort Wayne Indiana of all places, and looking at their website were quite a famous company- these organs are collectors items now.  I’m not sure how old this one is but the company made organs from 1872 – 1914, this one looks pretty old.

In the North wall is a blocked off doorway which probaby lead to a sacristy and there are carved figures on some of the block-stones.

There was a wonderful old grave slab set in the chancel floor, I think that’s the oldest I’ve come across on my travels

Here Lieth Hugh Brawne, The son of Captain Edmund Brawne Esquire, who deceased on the 25 of March Ano Domini 1636 ~ Charles 1st on the throne at this time.

Outside the graveyard is quite unkempt, but full of old gravestones.

Both Sophie and I missed getting a photo of the font, made from a roman alter, though no inscriptions on it. Never mind as it wasn’t that aesthetic.

After that we still had some afternoon left, so decided to go to the place where the North and South rivers of the Tyne meet, which was on our way home and somewhere I’d always wanted to see, not sure why but hey-ho I have these odd needs. 😀 😀

so stay tooned for that!

refs:
https://www.britainexpress.com/counties/northumbria/churches/haydon-bridge-old-church.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haydon_Bridge
http://www.packardorgan.com

 

Souter Lighthouse ~ March 2019

The History Bit

On the coast near the village of Marsden on the outskirts of South Shields, stands the rather magnificent looking Souter Lighthouse. This lighthouse was the first in the world to be designed and built specifically to use AC (alternating electric current) and was the most technically advanced lighthouse of its day. Opening in 1871 it was described as ‘without doubt one of the most powerful lights in the world’.  Originally planned to be built on Souter Point, from where it gets its name, it ended up being built on Lizard Point which had higher cliffs and therefore better visibility.  As there was already a Lizard Lighthouse in Cornwall, they didn’t bother to rename it.

The lighthouse was definitely needed by the time it was up and running. Prior to that there had been several shipwrecks at Whitburn Steel, (the name of that bit of coast) due to the underlying dangerous reef. In 1860 alone 20 wrecks had occurred, and it was known as the most dangerous coastline in the country, with an average of 44 wrecks for each mile.

The lighthouse didn’t use incandescent bulbs, but instead used carbon arcs, and the 800,000 candle power light could be seen for 26 miles. The main lens array consisted of a third-order fixed catadioptric optic surrounded by a revolving assembly of eight vertical condensing-prisms which produced one flash every minute. There was extra light to highlight hazardous rocks to the south which was powered using light diverted (through a set of mirrors and lenses) from the landward side of the main arc lamp.

In 1914 it was decided to give up the pioneering electric light and it was converted to more conventional oil lamps with a new, much larger bi-form first-order catadioptric revolving optic, which is still there today.  Then in 1952 it was converted back to mains electricity and the revolving optic was run by electrically run clockwork until 1983.  Sadly the lighthouse was decommissioned in 1988, but continued to serve as a radio navigation beacon up until 1999 when it was finally closed.  No need for lighthouses now what with GPS and satellite navigation taking their place.

Souter Lighthouse was never automated and remains much in its original operational state, apart from maintenance and updates to its electrical apparatus and lanterns.

Souter Lighthouse

The grassed area north of Souter was once a thriving community of 700 people. Built as a mining village in 1874 to house the workers at the new Whitburn Colliery.  The best coal seams in the North East extend out into the North Sea here and Whitburn Coal Company sunk two shafts south of the lighthouse between 1874 – 1877 with the first coal brought out in 1881. By 1898 it was producing 2,600 tons of coal per day. The colliery finally closed in 1968. The reclaimed land is now Whitburn Coastal Park.

Whitburn Coastal Park

The Lighthouse is owned by the National Trust now and you can go and have a look around inside and climb the top. The engine room, light tower and keeper’s living quarters are all on view. Two of the former lighthouse keepers’ cottages are used as National Trust holiday cottages. The lighthouse is said to be haunted, and has even featured on British TV’s Most Haunted ghost-hunting programme. 🙄

We went first to look around the inside of the lighthouse, there’s a lot of gubbins!

copper gubbins

lens and lamp

One of the volunteers was there when we were, and was twiddling knobs and handles to build up the air pressure that drives the foghorn, which still works.

Mr.Foghorn

more gubbins

going up

When the pressure was right the Mr.Foghorn told us to follow him so we could set off the foghorn.

Sophie with the foghorn button.

Sophie hit the button and the foghorn nearly blew my ears off!

One of the old bulbs.

We saw the keepers living quarters.

After that we climbed the very steep spiral staircase to get to the top, the last section was just a ladder! But the views were great!

The Foghorn

It only takes a morning to do the lighthouse, so in the afternoon we went off to Cleadon, which apart from being where the posh people live, has an ice~age duck pond and a gothic grotto. So stay tooned for that!

refs
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Souter_Lighthouse
https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/souter-lighthouse-and-the-leas