Alnwick November 2022

On Sophies first weekend back from Spain, we decided to organise our photography trip around our favourite café, regular readers will know we love The Rocking Horse Café up in the Alnwick area of Northumberland. Before lunch though we went to visit Barter Books on the outskirts of Alnwick town.

A l’il History Bit

Alnwick Railway Station is a Victorian building designed by William Bell and opened in 1887. In 1991, after the closure of the branch line to Alnwick 10 years before, it reopened as a second~hand book shop having been bought by Stuart and Mary Manley who also run it. 350,000 people a year come to visit it, 140,000 of those from outside the area according to Wiki, but that isn’t surprising, Alnwick isn’t THAT big! Anyway it’s one of the largest second-hand bookshops in Europe, and is notable for using a barter system (hence the name) whereby customers can exchange their books for credit against future purchases, but you can also just buy books like in a shop.

It’s also quite famous, as in 2000, the owner discovered a box of old books bought at auction and in it was a WW2 poster from 1939 that hadn’t seen the light of day until then. I see you wondering why that made it famous, doesn’t sound like much, but you might have seen what became of the poster.

On to some pictures I took inside

Everything is only order and beauty, quiet luxury and peace.
Where no Storms Come
Paranormal Beauty
Luxury, peace and pleasure.

They have rare books in locked glass cupboards as they have had a robbery in the past.

The Pied Piper
Flowers from Leonard Cohen 🤷‍♀️
To Posterity and Beyond! ~ Books Lightyear. I made a joke. 🥴

After having a good old wander through the sections, we both purchased a couple of books each, and then we went off to Rock, for lunch at The Rocking Horse. Check out the menu, yum!

It’s a dog friendly café and there are 3 resident border collies.

doggies.

After lunch we drove down the coast to Alnmouth an visited the Old Gun Battery Emplacement ruin, as you do, so stay tooned for next week!

📷 😊

Day 321~366

Didn’t get home today until late, and man has the weather changed! Temperatures way down, the wind blowing a hooley and now rain as well. It wasn’t a bad morning, but can’t do photography at work! So this evening I needed the ‘creative’ bit of my brain and came up with the following.

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The balls magnification properties are quite funky I think.

Day 270~377

An ISBN is an International Standard Book Number. ISBNs were 10 digits in length up to the end of December 2006, but since 1 January 2007 they now always consist of 13 digits. ISBNs are calculated using a specific mathematical formula and include a check digit to validate the number.
Each ISBN consists of 5 elements with each section being separated by spaces or hyphens. Three of the five elements may be of varying length:
• Prefix element – currently this can only be either 978 or 979. It is always 3 digits in length
• Registration group element – this identifies the particular country, geographical region, or language area participating in the ISBN system. This element may be between 1 and 5 digits in length
• Registrant element – this identifies the particular publisher or imprint. This may be up to 7 digits in length
• Publication element – this identifies the particular edition and format of a specific title. This may be up to 6 digits in length
• Check digit – this is always the final single digit that mathematically validates the rest of the number. It is calculated using a Modulus 10 system with alternate weights of 1 and 3.
What is an ISBN used for?
An ISBN is essentially a product identifier used by publishers, booksellers, libraries, internet retailers and other supply chain participants for ordering, listing, sales records and stock control purposes. The ISBN identifies the registrant as well as the specific title, edition and format.
What does an ISBN identify?
ISBNs are assigned to text-based monographic publications (i.e. one-off publications rather than journals, newspapers, or other types of serials).
Any book made publicly available, whether for sale or on a gratis basis, can be identified by ISBN.
In addition, individual sections (such as chapters) of books or issues or articles from journals, periodicals or serials that are made available separately may also use the ISBN as an identifier.
With regard to the various media available, it is of no importance in what form the content is documented and distributed; however, each different product form (e.g. paperback, EPUB, .pdf) should be identified separately.
(info from www.isbn-international.or)

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Day 241~366

A colouring book is a type of book containing line art to which a reader may add colour using crayons, coloured pencils, marker pens, paint or other artistic media. Traditional colouring books and colouring pages are printed on paper or card. Some colouring books have perforated edges so their pages can be removed from the books and used as individual sheets. Others may include a story line and so are intended to be left intact.

Paint books and colouring books emerged in the United States as part of the “democratization of art” process, inspired by a series of lectures by British artist Joshua Reynolds, and the works of Swiss educator Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi and his student Friedrich Fröbel. Many educators concluded that all, regardless of background, students stood to benefit from art education as a means of enhancing their conceptual understanding of the tangible, developing their cognitive abilities, and improving skills that would be useful in finding a profession, as well as for the children’s spiritual edification.The McLoughlin Brothers are credited as the inventors of the colouring book, when, in the 1880s, they produced The Little Folks’ Painting Book, in collaboration with Kate Greenaway. They continued to publish colouring books until the 1920s, when the McLoughlin Brothers became part of the Milton Bradley Company.

(info from Wiki)

Had the grandkids over today, and as they were colouring in, I thought yay! there’s my topic for today!

Cal & Matty
Cal & Matty

Liddy, Cal & Livvy
Liddy, Cal & Livvy

Liddy eating the crayon box, Livvy and Cal colouring in.
Liddy eating the crayon box, Livvy and Cal colouring in.

Day 108~366

Next Sunday sees the return of one of our fave TV shows, Game of Thrones (the other being The Walking Dead) and Phil is re-reading the book. Thought I’d have a little look and see how far he’d got. 🙂

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Day 29~366

“Nobody sees a flower – really – it is so small it takes time – we haven’t time – and to see takes time, like to have a friend takes time.”
― Georgia O’Keefe

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Day 27~366

Le Vicomte de Bragelonne ou Dix ans plus tard is a novel by Alexander Dumas.   It is the third and last of the d’Artagnan romances, following The Three Musketeers and Twenty Years After. It appeared first in serial form between 1847 and 1850. In the English translations, the 268 chapters of this large volume are usually subdivided into three, but sometimes four or even five individual books. I have 2 of the french books, would love to find the rest. 

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Day 19~366

My 2nd favourite camera is my SX70, which I’ve been neglecting so much since starting the 366, intending to shoot a few film packs when the weather perks up.

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Day 18~366

This book is lovely, you can see from the previous day’s picture there are pages of beautiful artworks by a few different lady artists. It was published  in 1922 so not far off 100 years old, and the language and pictures reflect a different world back then. But the gardening advice is still relevant.

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Day 16~366

I went to a party last night and am having a recovery day today haha.  Still managed to focus (just about) on my shot for today, now I’m going to veg out with the TV and some movies. And lots of medicinal cups of tea 🙂 Never again.

 

Til the next time. 😀

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Day 15~366

Holy moly we have blue skies! Still freezing and the snow is still around, but a bit of sun and blue certainly makes a nice change.  I heard on th e radio that one village in Pembrokeshire, Wales has had rain for 80 consecutive days! 80! I’d shoot meself. Anyway here’s my photo to celebrate the blue! Also posting the final part of Fuerteventura on the filmblog, must sort out the next lot!

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