Easby Abbey

Following on from our trip to Richmond Castle, Sophie and I went a mile and a half down the road to the ruins of Easby Abbey, and as you know, before we get to the pictures, we must first do

The History Bit 🍪 ☕️

Nobby

Easby Abbey, or The Abbey of St.Agatha is one of the best preserved monsteries of the Premonstratensian order. Premonstratensian is a bit of a mouthful, and I’d never heard of it so in case I’m not the only one here’s a quick run down of what it was/is. It’s full title is The Order of Canons Regular of Prémontré, also known as the Norbertines (sounds like a grunge pop group) and in Britain and Ireland the White Canons, on account of the canons wearing white habits.

Founded in 1120 by Norbert of Xanten (which is in Germany). Norbert has nothing to do with Easby Abbey per se, but he’s an interesting chap so lets dig a bit deeper into his history. Nobby’s Dad, Heribert, Count of Gennep, was a member of the high nobility of the Holy Roman Empire and related to the imperial house and also to the House of Lorraine. Because of the family connections, he was ordained as clergy to the church of St. Victor at Xanten, wherein his only job was to chant the Divine Office. Nobby wasn’t up for that so much and paid someone else a small fee to do it for him while he went off to become a councillor to the emperor Henry V in Cologne. The salaries he got from the Xanten church and the royal treasury allowed him to live in the style of the nobility of the times.

He quite liked living high on the hog for not so much work, and managed to avoid ordination as a priest and also turned down the chance to become a Bishop of Cambrai in 1113. But two years later, Nobby had a near death experience whilst riding his horse to Verdun. A thunderbolt from a storm struck near his horses feet, naturally the horse threw him and he lay unconscious for nearly an hour. Nobby saw this as a wake up call, gave up his posh life at court and returned to his church in Xanten to live a life of penance placing himself under the direction of Cono, Abbot of St Sigeberg. In gratitude to Cono Nobby founded the Abbey of Fürstenberg in 1115, endowed it with some of his property and gave it over to Cono and his Benedictine successors, which was jolly nice of him I think.

Nobby was 35 years old at this point and soon accepted ordination as a priest and became a great devotee of the Eucharist and Our Lady. He adopted a lifestyle of ascetism, (adopting a frugal lifestyle, characterised by the renunciation of material possessions and physical pleasures, and also spending time fasting while concentrating on the practice of religion or reflection upon spiritual matters.) Unfortunately his ascetism was so fierce it killed his first three disciples. 🙄 He tried to reform the canons of Xanten, but in light of not wanting to starve to death, they declined and denounced him to some council or other, whereupon Nobby resigned his positions, and sold up his properties to give to the poor. Off he went to visit Pope Gelasius II who gave Nobby permission to wander as an itinerate preacher so he trundled around Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and northern France, where he did some unspecified miracles. Along the way, in many settlements he visited he found a demoralised clergy, often lonely chaps, feeling abandoned by the official church, and practicing what’s known as concubinage, which means they were indulging in matters of bodily naughtiness with ladies they could not marry.

He also became acquainted with the Cistercian administrative system that created an international federation of monasteries with a fair amount of centralized power, though local houses had a certain amount of independence. These reforms, written up in their “Charter of Charity” would affect him significantly in his own future work. Nobby gained a lot of acolytes and founded houses of his order all over the shop, firstly in Premontre, as well as becoming the Apostle of Antwerp after combatting a heretical preacher called Tanchelm. He became the Archbishop of Magdeburg where he survived a few assassination attempts whilst reforming the lax discipline of his see. In 1126 and in his last years, he was chancellor and adviser to Lothair II, the Holy Roman Emperor, persuading him to lead an army in 1133 to Rome to restore Innocent to the papacy.

Nobby died in 1134, and initially buried in Magdeburg. The abbot of Strahov in Prague was able to claim the body after a few problems such as Magdeburg turning protestant and military fisticuffs and such like. He is now buried there in a glass fronted tomb and was canonised by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582, so is now Saint Nobby.

So back to Easby and it is listed in the Domesday survey of 1086 as ‘Asebi’, which was held by Enisan Murdac, an important local landowner who was a vassal of Alan le Roux or ‘the Red’, Earl of Richmond (c 1040–1093) whomst you may remember from the History Bit re: Richmond Castle.

The abbey of St Agatha at Easby was founded in about 1152 by Roald, constable or principal officer of Richmond. It’s thought he was the son of Hasculfus Musard, lord of Tansor in Northamptonshire and of estates in Oxfordshire. He established Easby as a Premonstratensian monastery, only the third such house to be founded in England. In the process, the existing minster community was probably absorbed into the new abbey.

Roald endowed a modest bit of land to Easby which rose slowly, over the centuries and there are over 100 charters documenting it’s rise. Sheep farming seems to have been their main income. Not much is known about the early buildings of the monstery, but there is a re-used 12th century doorway in the west range of the cloister, and surviving fragments of the abbey church probably dating from 1170 or 80. In the 12th and 13th centuries the monastery prospered, with the increase of more Canons and the replacing of the original buildings on a grand scale. In 1198 Egglestone Abbey in nearby Teesdale was founded as Easby’s only daughter house.

During this time Roald’s descendents kept hold of the constableship of Richmond going all lah-de-dah and styling themselves De Burton or De Richmond, but then in the late 13th and 14th centuries they started to sell off their estates for unknown reasons.

In come the Scropes of Bolton, a family from Wensleydale, and landowners of knightly rank. They made the abbey their buriel place and it’s most likely they paid for an extension to the chancel in the 14th century. In 1392 Sir Richard Scrope the 1st Baron of Bolton granted land to the Abbey and it was substantially enlarged. Sir Richard served King Richard II and also fought in the Battle of Crécy under the Black Prince, (Richard II’s Daddy). He had been made Lord Chancellor in 1378, trying to stop Richard II spending all the treasury dosh on wars against the Pesky French, but resigned in 1380 when the government collapsed after all the military failures in France. He regained the position after the Peasants Revolt that had started then, but was sacked by King Richard for non-cooperation in 1382, so went off back to Bolton and rebuilt his castle there. He had a 4 year long dispute with Sir Robert Grosvenor over his armorial bearings for the right for his shield to be emblazoned “Azure, a bend Or.” A court of chivalry decided in his favour, with Geoffrey Chaucer gave evidence in his favour. Although his son William had been executed by King Henry IV for supporting the deposed King Richard, Henry held Sir Richard in high regard and allowed him to keep his lands and titles. He died in 1403 and was buried at Easby Abbey.

A good deal is known about the abbey between 1478 and 1500 when the abbey was subject to inspections on the state of it’s community. Richard Redman the Abbot of Shap and later the Bishop of Ely was the principal of the Premonstratensians in England and he recorded any goings on. In 1482 he discovered a canon called John Nym had run away after being accused of improper bodily naughtiness with a widow, Elizabeth Swales. Redman wanted him found and to face a tribunal, which he was and he did, where he was exonerated. By 1494 he was the Abbot in charge. Redman also observed that although the Abbey was in debt, the buildings were well maintained and food was provided.

In the 16th century little is known about the abbey, but in 1535 the then Abbot, Robert Bampton, drew up a document restating the rights of the Scropes as patrons. Round about this time there were rumours that Englands monasteries would be suppressed and it’s thought he issued this document to obtain the Scropes support for keeping the monastery intact.

That was a vain hope in the end, as the year after Easby Abbey was closed. Their were only 11 canons left by then, so the abbey and it’s lands were let to Lord Scrope of Bolton for £300. Also by this time Richmond was taking a major part in the Pilgrimage of Grace, whereby the north rose up in support of the monasteries. That went tit’s up and by Springtime 1537 the leaders of the uprising had missed the opportunity to defeat the Crown’s forces. It was, of course, Henry VIII in charge at this time, and he was well miffed about the uprising. His pal the Duke of Norfolk was tasked with crushing the rebels, and Henry wrote to him saying “at your repair to … St Agatha and such other places as have made resistance … you shall without pity or circumstance … cause the monks to be tied up [hanged] without further delay. Vengeance was a thing with Henry.

The Abbey was returned to the Scropes but by 1538 most of the buildings had been demolished and the lead roofing stripped. The Scropes gave up the lease in 1550 and the abbey and estates went through several pairs of hands before another Lord Scrope, Henry, bought it back in 1579. There’s no evidence of any repairs being done to the Abbey between the 16th and 18th centuries and an engraving of it in 1721 sees it not much different from it’s present state.

The Scropes passed it on through the family until the death of Lord Emmanuel Scrope in 1630. His daughter Annabel married John Grubham Howe and so the estate passed into the Howe family. In 1700 Sir Scrope Howe (way to go combining the names!) sold it to Bartholomew Burton and then it passed through several different hands until 1816 when Robert Jaques bought it.

Late 18th century and 19th the abbey became known for being a romantic ruin and was painted by several artists including JMW Turner between 1816-18. Then in the 19th century it became the plaything of antiquarians, and Sir William St John Hope partially excavated it in 1885-6. It was still owned by the Jaques family up until 1930 when it was taken over by the Ministry of Works.

And some pictures I took of it to finish up with.

The graveyard

refs:-

https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/easby-abbey/history/

https://www.britainexpress.com/counties/yorkshire/abbeys/easby.htm

47 Comments

  1. Love that first photo of the graveyard.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Great photos (as always!)
    I love the bit about Nobby. I guess his fierce ascetism only applies to his disciples and not to him since he somehow survived while his disciples did not. But I think that’s how it always goes which extreme religious types.
    I will be seeing “The Norbertines” in concert this weekend— a highlight for me as they are my favorite grunge pop band! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You are unspammed 🙂 Thanks for commenting and letting me know!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Oh you found it! Good— I thought maybe it got lost somewhere in the interwebs (or perhaps I pissed Nobby off with my slight. He takes things a little too seriously 😳) 😂

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Interesting stories, and nice photos!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Cheers Marland.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Norbert of Xanten will be my new rap name

    Liked by 3 people

    1. It’s a good one!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Stunning photos! I guess a near death lightening bolt would be a life-awakening moment for most.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Indeed, 😃 thanks Jennie!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re welcome!

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Such ruins are so fascinating. The graveyard would be fun to wander through to read the writings on the stones. But what always amazes me is how often the grass in these ruins – all over England it seems – is short, cropped, and so green. Is it grass or a short type of vegetation that stays tidy? Anyway, this was a refreshing break from our hot days in suburbia.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s grass and someone mows it 😊 cheers Naomi!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Interesting story about “Nobby” of Xanten. I’ve ever heard of him, even if I was born and raised only about 35 miles south of Xanten.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. P.S.: “Premonstratensian” seems to be a good word for a sobriety test, doesn’t it? 😀

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Haha yes, though it won’t help me as I can’t say it either way!

      Liked by 2 people

  9. Love your image of the grasses and the graveyard…great light

    Liked by 1 person

  10. “Oooh Nobby…,” think how history and many lives would have been so very different if he would have interpreted the thunderbolt as “hey, let’s not ride in a storm!” I love the image through the doorway. I illustrates this story perfectly.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Such a great post and the pictures are so fine. And that old Nobby was a regular Saul of Tarsus.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. He was a bit! Cheers Don!

      Like

  12. Interesting story! You did a good job resuming it, almost a century covering the main events. Your photos are lovely as usual!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Elizabeth!

      Like

  13. Lovely framing through the archway

    Liked by 1 person

  14. You had some great light that day, and super photos too. When I was very young, my Dad worked with a man named Norbert. It was the only time in my life I ever met anyone with that name. Then when I started to drive up and down to here from London, house-hunting, I started to see these juggernauts on the M11 and M25.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norbert_Dentressangle
    Now I like to think he is an ancestor of Nobby.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Me too! I remember those, I saw a lot of them when commuting between Hemel Hempstead and Wardley! You know they had a reality tv programme about them at some point! 🙄

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Certainly it is familiar to some drawings I recall by Turner. Romantic ruins for a romantic painter; thank you, fragglerocking n.n

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So glad you enjoyed it!

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Beautiful shots as always. You went on a lovely day. The green and blue are sharp and gorgeous next to the ancient pillars and archways.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Cindy, I would like to go back and photograph it the way I do now.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. I had no idea that the Scrope buried at Easby was Chaucer’s friend. He, and the court case, is mentioned in the biography of Chaucer I read recently.

    You certainly had a lovely day for the visit; the photos are lovely. Did you go into the church with the wall paintings?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. No it wasn’t open sadly, not sure why.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That’s a shame. They’re worth seeing.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Yes, I’ll be back there at some point. Hope.

          Liked by 1 person

  18. I had posted a comment yesterday but didn’t hear back from you (that’s never happened before). I’m sorry if this goes on twice. But I loved the pictures (as always!) and loved the bit about Nobby. I made mention about his disciples and their religious fervor— crazy stuff. Killing off your disciples is no way to gather a great following. Lol

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I found it in the SPAM section 🙄 one of those WordPress hiccups! I think Nobby took austerity just a little too far 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  19. What a history to that place! I absolutely love that first photo of the graveyard – amazing.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. What interesting and naughty people they all were! Lovely pics 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha yes, cheers Steve.

      Like

  21. They do have some nice abbey ruins t’up north. Nice write up and shots, especially the graveyard!

    Liked by 1 person

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