St. Wilfred’s Church & Kirkharle ~ Dec 2019 ~Part 2

Part 1 HERE is where you’ll find the history of the church and Kirkharle.

The church itself is quite small but has some interesting features.

Stones with mason’s marks

mason’s marks

Windows with reticulated tracery (the stonework fills the head of the arch with repeated forms creating the appearance of a net-like pattern- wiki) which you can see at in this shot of the interior taken from the entrance.

The font of course, which we originally came looking for, originally from All Saints church in Newcastle, it dates from late 15th or early 16th century, and was installed at St.Wilfreds by George Anderson in 1884 after the church’s restoration. It is eight sided and decorated with the shields of arms of old Newcastle families, including the Andersons.

There are several monuments/gravestones for the Lorain family, I liked this one but it came out a bit blurry sorry.

“Here lies the body of Richard Loraine esq. who was a proper handsome man, of good sense and behaviour; he dy’d a Batchelor of an Appoplexy walking in a green field, near London, October 26th 1738 in the 38th year of his age.”

There is a triple sedilia (seats, usually made of stone, found on the liturgical south side of an altar, often in the chancel, for use during Mass for the officiating priest and his assistants, the deacon and sub-deacon. The seat is often set back into the main wall of the church itself – wiki).

Always good to find medieval grave slabs in good condition

and some pretty non-reticulated windows, thanks Clare 😘

all pictures embiggenable with a click,

full album of photographs HERE

That was our last outing in 2019, but we still did a few more before the Corona virus hit, so stay tooned for our next adventure!

39 thoughts on “St. Wilfred’s Church & Kirkharle ~ Dec 2019 ~Part 2

  1. Such a beautiful architecture, is exactly as I imagined a real event told by Sir Walter Scott, it was in a church like this, a nun is at night closing doors and so, and then through the window appears an old person floating, it happens some nights, and others not. The book is quite rational and nothing sensationalist so Sir Walter tells what happened, a person, an old lady, that visited the church garden, what the nun inside would see was not the lady but the projection of her reflection in the panes of the window. “Letters of witchcraft and demonology” : )

    Liked by 1 person

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