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On my last post, The Camel Parade, I said that that was the last report for a while as I’ve posted everything for my outings in 2017. Well I lied. 🙂 Not so much lied really, as completely overlooked mine and Sophies day out to see the Guildhall in Newcastle.  Usually you are not allowed in the building, but there are Heritage Open days where you can get a guided tour of it, and Sophie booked us to go on one.

The History Bit

The building was designed by Robert Trollope and completed in 1655. Trollope was a 17th-century English architect, born in Yorkshire, who worked mainly in Northumberland and Durham. A propos of nothing, he was buried in St Mary’s church Gateshead where he’d designed and built his own monument with statue of himself and inscription that reads
“Here lies Robert Trollop

Who made yon stones roll up

When death took his soul up

His body filled this hole up”.

More Pam Ayres than Wordsworth, but he lives on in his magnificent buildings.

The frontage of the building was rebuilt to designs by William Newton and David Stephenson in 1794. The east end of the building is an extension designed by John Dobson and completed in 1823.

So on with the pictures!

In the stairwell on the way up to the courtrooms

Charles II in Roman Army Gear, who knows why!  His feet look really big to me!

The statue was placed originally placed at the North End of the Tyne Bridge, on the restoration of Charles II to the throne.  It had the motto Adventus Regis solemn gregis. i.e the coming of the king is the comfort of his people.On 15th June 1771 it was moved and placed in a niche on the side of the Exchange (this is what the Guildhall was known as back then).  It was finally moved to where it is now in 1794.  I got this information from a book published in 1826 by John Sykes (bookseller of Newcastle), and the full fascinating story can be found HERE 

The courtroom

In 1649 15 people were hanged on the Town Moor for the crime of Witchcraft, they were tried here.

Mind your head!

The Merchant Adventurers Hall was quite something..

John 21:6 🙂

Ceiling detail

All the mayors coats of arms, from then until now.

Fake fire!

 

Had me fooled! 🙂

 

Stay tooned for part 2, which will be even more stunning than part 1, really! 😀

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54 comments on “Newcastle Guild Hall, and Quayside ~ December 2017

  1. raistlin0903 says:

    I’m very glad that you “lied”, else we would not have been able to enjoy this post today. Strange isn’t it? The “crime” of Witchcraft. It makes me sad that there have actually been people that have thought this way back in those days. Once again this was a great post with absolutely amazing pictures 😊😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much! I can’t ever think of witchcraft without seeing jack Nicholson, Cher, Michelle Pfffffffiper & Susan Sarandon in my head! 😊

      Liked by 1 person

      1. raistlin0903 says:

        Haha…one of the first comments I read just after waking up, and this cracked me up 😂😂

        Liked by 2 people

        1. Because it totally looks like it!😂 You can’t deny it!😂

          Liked by 2 people

          1. raistlin0903 says:

            Haha…yeah….that’s exactly why I am not saying anything on it lol 😂😂😂

            Liked by 2 people

    2. I’m not going to lie that statue of the dude looks like he is holding his really long and narrow member to match his feet!😂😂😂

      Liked by 2 people

      1. raistlin0903 says:

        Nope…not going to say anything here 😇😇😇

        Liked by 2 people

        1. You know it looks like it!!!😂😂

          Liked by 2 people

  2. Sue says:

    Interesting post, Fraggle…after getting over the fact that you lied😉😉

    Liked by 2 people

    1. 😂 obviously I’m mortified. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sue says:

        😀😀🙄

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Jay says:

    You got some really great, imposing details!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. beetleypete says:

    Such history. Imagine the terror of those poor people being ‘tried’ for Witchcraft. The trials were a mockery, as they were always found ‘Guilty’. (At least I never read about anyone being acquitted)
    Best wishes, Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s an amazing place Pete, you really feel the age of the place when you’re there.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. kmSalvatore says:

    Wow.. if wallls could talk , amazing photos Fraggy. Witches were actually hung there.. ?,,, ! Had to b something walking around there . I can’t wait to see part2 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. April Munday says:

    If part 2 is even more stunning, I can’t wait. That’s an amazing building, although I’m not sure about Carolus II.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, not sure what that was all about either. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. April Munday says:

        Thank you. I had a quick Google as well. Apparently Louis XIV started a bit of a fashion of monarchs being presented as Roman emperors. I can see that it would be a good idea to suck up to the new monarch at the Restoration, so it starts to make sense.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. rmacwheeler says:

    cool…I promise to stay tooned.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Fabulous photographs – so sharp! I didn’t think you take photographs in court rooms. As for Charles II dressed like a Roman, my immediate thought was that it must have been part of a nice game he was playing with Nell G, or one of his other little friends…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hiya Mike, I’ve since found some fun facts about the statue and have updated the post accordingly, check it out it’s right up your street! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Looks like a fantastic ceiling!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The whole place is a dream Graham!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. joshi daniel says:

    Looks interesting 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Loved this post, Fraggle! I LOVED reading the history and seeing your wonderful photos! Reading your posts are a sure way to always brighten my day! You ROCK Fraggle Rockin!😎

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Fab insight CJ. Never been inside ever. Great pics.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks John, look out for Heritage Days they do this a couple of times a year.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Jessica says:

    Interesting history! Your country really does have a lot more and much older historical sites than the U.S.!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Jess, I bet you could find some just as old, Cahokia Mounds, Chumash Cave Paintings… there’s a few about in your fair land.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Jessica says:

        You’re probably right. There’s certainly old history here, just not old castles and cool things like that!

        Liked by 1 person

  14. I suppose it’s no wonder the room gave me such an ominous feeling. Although I really like the work at the ceiling. That “prisoners area” is downright scary. This was quite an adventure. Thanks for taking us with you. Happy Valentine’s Day hugs!

    Like

    1. Thanks Teagan, have a grand day!

      Like

  15. What an opportunity to see and photograph something you can’t usually get access to. And what a building it is. And you captured some really lovely images. Had to laugh of Dani’s comment. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Otto, Dani has a way with words 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I love historical buildings! So much wonderful architecture!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is amazing what they did back then, that we really don’t anymore.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I feel like everyone now just cheap out and make a lot of things cookie cutter… Or it’s all chrome and windows. Not so much put into the looks and detail. I hope we can preserve that, or go back to it.. But, everything comes in waves! I remember when bell bottoms came back so you never know!

        Liked by 1 person

  17. Is the courtroom still in use?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Not as a courtroom, The Coopers Guild and The Freemen of Newcastle use it, but I’ll do more of that in part 2.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I shall read about it then!

        Liked by 1 person

  18. I’m so glad you “lied” Fraggle. Having lived my entire life in Danvers, MA, aka Salem Village, where so many people were killed for witchcraft, this is of particular interest to me. And as usual your pictures are gorgeous!🤗

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Kim, it wasn’t the best occupation to have!

      Liked by 1 person

  19. steviegill says:

    Nice shots. Some very ornate and detailed reliefs on display there.

    Liked by 1 person

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