Fraggle’s Newcastle Upon Tyne report~The Cathedral Part 1


Last week on Thursday as y’all know, Sophie and I went into Newcastle to have lunch with the cats. Afterwards we had a wander around and then visited the Cathedral and the Castle, so loads of photographs to come šŸ™‚ We dipped into the cathedral to kill a bit of time as we were early for our luncheon appointment, but decided we would go back after lunch as there was so much to see. The Cathedral isn’t very big, not like Durham or Canterbury,York etc, but some beautiful artwork and stonework inside. All shots with Fuji XT1.

The Cathedral

The Cathedral

The History Bit

Founded in 1091 during the same period as the nearbyĀ castle, the Norman church was destroyed by fire in 1216 and the current building was completed in 1350, so is mostly of theĀ Perpendicular styleĀ of the 14th century. Its tower is noted for its 15th-century lantern spire. Heavily restored in 1777, the building was raised to cathedral status in 1882, when it became known as the Cathedral Church of St Nicholas.

The cathedral is notable for its unusual lantern spire, which was constructed in 1448. For hundreds of years, it was a main navigation point for ships using theĀ River Tyne.Ā On each corner of the lantern are gilded statues, ofĀ AdamĀ eating the apple,Ā EveĀ holding out the apple,Ā AaronĀ is dressed as a Bishop, andĀ DavidĀ holds a harp.Ā The interior of the church was badly damaged byĀ ScottishĀ invaders during their brief occupation of the city in 1640, and in 1644, during a nine-week siege, Scottish invaders threatened to bombard the lantern tower, but were deterred when the mayor Sir John Marley put his Scottish prisoners in it. šŸ™‚ Good chap!

So here’s my pics of the inside.

The West Door

The West Door

The Font

The Font

The Font was made in the 15th century and the wooden canopy used to be directly above it, but at some point the spire shifted and so now is not quite symmetrical!

missed!

missed!

The Nave

The Nave

Window

Window

The Chancel & Sophie

The Chancel & Sophie

Closer

Closer

The Pulpit was carved in the 1880s from Uttoxeter alabaster by Robert Beall to the design of R J Johnson, who was the church architect at the time. The niches contain the figures of the Saints Barnabas, Philip, Paul, John the Baptist and Peter, as stated on the information board at the base

Pulpit decoration

Pulpit decoration

One of the Pulpit figures

One of the PulpitĀ saints.

A lot of the original stained glass was lost in the civil war, so most of it is 18th & 19th Century.

Stained Glass Window_modern

Stained Glass Window_modern

This next window detailĀ made us smile as we’d not long ago visited that Island.

Puffin & Farne Island!!

Puffin & Farne Island!!

door to the crypt

doorway into the crypt.

Cross & stone in the crypt

Cross & stone in the crypt

Hidden gem in the crypt

Hidden gem in the crypt

Well that’s enough for now, will leave some for another post, last day at work tomorrow and off to the wild west, then hopefully going to visit my son Ben & grandson Lewis and best friend HelenĀ on Thursday, lots of driving this week.

laters gaters

šŸ˜‰

part 2 HERE

Categories: Church, Fuji, photographyTags: , , , ,

13 comments

  1. I’ll be back when I can get on the computer .. For what ever reason, your pics are NOT showing up on my iPad;(((((

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow Fraggy, I’m on my phone.. I can’t wait to see these on the PC!!! I love stained glass, and the building is amazing! Wouldn’t it be awesome if you could get s stained glass of your island . That was so Kool to see , after just visiting there ;)! Really great work .. As always . Ok have a good week, be careful with all your driving ā¤ļøšŸ‘šŸ»

    Liked by 1 person

  3. “We all scream for Ice Cream!” haha, yeah, precisely I’ve tried one a moment ago. Thanks for the virtual tour Fragglerocking ^_^ I love the simple architecture of this cathedral, of course simple in comparison to the bigger ones because in itself it looks complex.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Interesting photos!
    Would that be historically accurate ice cream?

    Liked by 1 person

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