The York report 9 ~ York Minster Interior

Finally got to the last post on York, and this time inside York Minster.

TH-28
The Nave

TH-29

 

alter
alter

 

 

memorial
memorial

York as a whole, and particularly the minster, have a long tradition of creating beautiful stained glass. Some of the stained glass in York Minster dates back to the 12th century. The Minster’s records show that much of the glass (white or coloured) came from Germany. Because of the extended time periods during which the glass was installed, different types of glazing and painting techniques which evolved over hundreds of years are visible in the different windows. Approximately two million individual pieces of glass make up the cathedral’s 128 stained glass windows. Much of the glass was removed before and pieced back together after the 1st and 2nd world wars,and the windows are constantly being cleaned and conserved to keep their beauty intact, which was happening to the magnificent East Window, so we didn’t get to see that a.

TH-31
The West Window constructed 1338

 

TH-34

 

TH-44

 

The choir screen has a statue of every King of England

Choir screen
Choir screen
choir screen
choir screen

 

lectern
lectern
carvings
carvings
lost his head
lost his head

We went into the undercroft, the vaulted cellar below ground level. It has archaeological remains covering all of York’s history, from the Roman fort to the Norman foundations. There’s an exhibit of artifacts on display in the undercroft normally, including a luscious Norman-era 12th century relief of sinners being tortured by demons in Hell’s cauldron known as the Doomstone.

The Doorstone
The Doomstone
shrine
shrine
Norman Pillar
Norman Pillar

Lots of tombs and shrines in the walls of the Minster

TH-42

TH-45
cherub

There are 2 interesting clocks in the Minster, a medieval mechanical clock where 2 armed figures strike the 1/4 hours

Medieval mechanical clock
Medieval mechanical clock

and an astronomical clock,  installed in the North Transept  in 1955. It was first conceived in 1944 and designed by R d’E Atkinson. The clock is a memorial to the airmen operating from bases in Yorkshire, Durham, and Northumberland who were killed in action during WW2. It’s quite a complicated clock to get your head around as Atkinson based the design on the appearance of the sun and stars from the viewpoint of a pilot flying over York, and if you are interested how it works HERE is the link. As it happens damage to the clock’s mechanism was sustained during the fire of 9 July 1984; after 10 years’ reparation work, vergers ceased winding it owing to inaccuracies of time-keeping. 😦

astronomical clock
astronomical clock

The Chapter House, where the day to day business of the Minster was run, was begun in about 1260 and is a superb example of the Gothic Decorated style which was then all the rage.

The entrance to the Chapter House is along a fairly low passage, which gives no hint of what is to come. You pass through a twin arched door…

to the chapter house
to the chapter house

…where a wonderfully carved Madonna and child stand, and enter into a circular space ringed with low stalls.

Madonna & child
Madonna & child

Then when you go inside, the stained glass windows are beautiful, and led your eyes up to this gorgeous ribbed vault ceiling.

chapter house ceiling
chapter house ceiling

Hard to believe it’s made out of wood, but it is. A masterpiece of medieval architecture. I tried a panorama with the iPhone, which didn’t work too well, you can see the roof lines are all jittery, but it gives you an idea..

jittery pano
jittery pano
around the chapter house
around the chapter house, stalls details.

 

Finally, whilst doing the tour underneath the Minster to see the Roman Fort ruins that still are visible (The Minster was built ovee part of the Fort ruins) we came across this wonderful Viking Horn.

One of the few surviving artefacts from the beginning of the eleventh century, the Horn of Ulf is a large elephant tusk which was carved in Salerno in Italy.  The figures on it are believed to have been carved by Islamic carvers.

It belonged to a Viking nobleman, or thane, called Ulf or Ulphus.  Ulf owned large estates around York and throughout Yorkshire.  The Horn acted as a land deed and was given to the Minster when the land transferred in to the ownership of the Dean and Chapter of York.

It was lost during the Civil War but came back to York Minster, having had the silver mounts added during its disappearance.

The Horn of Ulf
The Horn of Ulf

So that ends the York Reports, hope you’ve enjoyed the journey, next time, Mount Grace Priory 🙂

laters gaters

😉

 

 

websites I used for researching history during the reports:-

York Press ~Horn of Ulf

History of York

Britain Express

Wiki

13 comments

  • I think #9 shows again your talent for photography and storytelling. You have an eye for composition. Never saw so straight lines of the inside of such a massive building. This was a very interesting and inspiring journey through history, time and locations. Thanks so much for preparation and for sharing it with us. Looking forward to your next “reports”. Nice Sunday, Fraggy! Reinhold

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Reinhold, the straight lines are courtesy of the warp tool in PSCC and the calibration feature in LR. Also some stitched images. Glad you enjoyed my journey around York. 😊

      Liked by 1 person

      • And guessed you used the features BUT I have some photos in MY portfolio where all these features would not help. You have to make things right to start working with these features. And I think you mastered this very well. I have learned a lot looking at your photos. Have a nice start into the coming week.

        Like

  • Wow, I don’t even know where to begin… Your words.. Your photography…, needless to say I’m in awe Fraggs !!!! As I moved along with the reading to see the pics… I’d say oh oh this is my favorite…… Till I saw the next picture….!!!!!
    Honestly, I’m amazed!!!!! To be able to see history….. Truly amazes me. !!!!
    Fantastic work my friend!!!! Till next time sista❤️🍷

    Liked by 1 person

  • Fantastic! I only have very vague recollections of being inside there, and even then I seem to remember there was a lot of repair work (*) going on at the time so a lot was covered up. Your photo essay is wonderful.

    (*) I’ve just looked this up, and we were there in September 1984 – there had been a massive fire in July started when the minster was struck by lightening (http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/july/9/newsid_2498000/2498525.stm)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Probably not the best time to have gone! I can only recommend a revisit, as I’m going to do when the East window is back up, York is a brill place for a weekend away.

      Liked by 1 person

  • Is there anywhere so beautiful & full of history. Your images are breathtakingly gorgeous. I am having a hard time catching up with your posts and not because there are too many. I like to pore over them and go back for another look! There is just so much to see. Thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • oh dear I’m posting daily nearly as I’ve been to a lot of places recently! Thanks for visiting, am glad you are enjoying the pictures.

      Like

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