The York Report 7~York Minster exterior

York Minster, the 2nd largest Gothic Cathedral in Northern Europe. And what a beauty, I could spend many happy hours in this stunning place. But first a potted history 🙂

Starting out as a wooden building in 627 AD (1388 yrs ago!!) in the 630’s it was rebuilt in stone then fell into disrepair by 670. A chap called St.Wilfred took over and repaired and renewed it. Then in 741 it was burnt down, and consequently rebuilt with even more impressive stonework. The church and the entire area then passed through the hands of numerous invaders, and its history is obscure until the 10th century. The church was damaged in 1069 during William the Conqueror’s harrying of the north, but the first Norman archbishop,Thomas of Bayeux, arriving in 1070, organised repairs. The Danes destroyed the church in 1075, but it was again rebuilt from 1080 in the Norman style. Basically, up until 1230 it was up and down like a lady of the night’s undergarments, but the present building was begun in about 1230 and completed in 1472. There is constant restoration work going on, and at the time of our visit, the Great East Window is in the process of renovation at an estimated cost of £23 million, so we couldn’t see that unfortunately as it is quite spectacular by all accounts.

I took a lot of shots so this will be a 3 part post, and in this first one I’m concentrating on the exterior.

Firstly, there’s no way my little fuji could take in the whole building, so I tried to do a panorama which kind of worked, but isn’t all that great.

York Minster pano
York Minster pano

I tried pulling it about in PS but couldn’t quite get the bottom part right, so Phil’s head is a bit stretched. But I had a go and learned a bit about warping and the like so not a waste of time. This was an evening shot and the light was lovely on the sandstone.

Front door
Front door

This is the door you go through to get in and it’s the west end of the building.

North Transept & Chapter House
North Transept & Chapter House

This is the view of the minster from The Treasurers House which you can see in the previous post if you click on the link. The chapter house has the pointy roof, and that long set of windows on the left is The Five Sisters window.

North Transept
Bird house

while I was photographing the tower a chap asked me if I was trying to photograph the peregrine falcons, I didn’t know what he was on about at first, but apparently a breeding pair of the birds are nesting in the top window there. Didn’t see them though.

side view (north)
side view (south)
side view, (north)
side view, (north)
chapter house
chapter house
detail from the south side
detail from the south side

TH-26

The grounds of the Minster have a seating area done in the same kind of stone, and with decorative motifs in keeping with the carvings on the Minster.

in keeping
in keeping

and also there is a really lovely war memorial

remembrance
remembrance

I also took some hipstamatic shots on the iphone

front door hipsta style
front door hipsta style
Visitors entrance hipstamatic
side door hipstamatic
looking up
looking up

The thing I loved best about the building were the gargoyles, so many different ones, you can’t make out many here, but that’s for my next post.

laters gaters

😉

13 comments

  • Oh Fraggy , magnificent !! You could spend a few days just shooting that place , too bad u couldn’t see the Falcons . We have them here . Ok, I got off track.. What a building and history , you know our History doesn’t go into great lengths about your England , so it’s very nice to get the “full effect ” from you . And I’m looking forward to your next installment , I love Gargoyols .❤️👍

    Like

  • The light is magical in the first one with its golden nature and in the titled “in keeping” it seems more a living being trying to send a message in the sculpted stone. Thanks =)

    Liked by 1 person

  • Evening light on sandstone. Beautiful. I was impressed when I saw it on the cathedrals in York and Wells. And it impresses me again looking at your photos. Catching the light is the most inspiring thing in photography. Looking forward to the gargoyle post. Thanks for sharing these “warm” photos and information with us.

    Liked by 1 person

  • It drives me crazy when you have such a big church and you can’t capture it all in one shot. It’s almost like you have to resort to aerial photography. You’re right though, the church is much prettier in the evening light. I didn’t realize that it was sandstone…it looks almost golden 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  • Fraggs, I see you have a bunch of posts on York! I was out of town and missed them all, but guess what?!?! I was in York for a day! I wonder if we were there the same time. 😉 Looking forward to making some time to go back and see York through your eyes.

    Liked by 1 person

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