The York Report 6 ~ The Treasurers House.

Another little bit of history and today it’s all about Frank Green and The Treasurers House. York Minster, the whopping great Cathedral that I’ve yet to do a post on, first had a treasurer in 1091. Thats 924 yrs ago! Not surprisingly the original building is gone apart from an external wall from the 12th century. In 1547 The Reformation put paid (pun intended 🙂 ) to the job of treasurer and the house was given to The Archbishops of York. Thomas Young who was Archbishop between 1561 and 1568, and his descendants are responsible for the structure of Treasurer’s House as it is today. In the early 17th century the Young family added the symmetrical front and almost entirely rebuilt the house. The Treasurer’s House played host to royalty when Sir George Young entertained King James 1st in 1617. The house then passed through a number of private owners.

Frank Green was a wealthy collector, and owned Treasurer’s House between 1897 and 1930. He demolished the additions made to the building in the 19th century and restored the house to what he thought was its original shape. He turned Treasurer’s House into a stage for his collection, designing rooms of different periods to display his antique furniture. It was at this time that Treasurer’s House received a second royal visit, in June 1900. Edward VII and Queen Alexandra visited as Prince and Princess of Wales along with their daughter Victoria. It was in their honour that the King’s Room, Queen’s Room and Princess Victoria’s Room were so named.

Frank Green was a very precise man, in both his own appearance and the way he ran his home. He was a bit of a ‘dandy’, neatly dressed and often seen wearing a floppy silk bow tie. He had studs fixed to the floor in the rooms of Treasurer’s House so the house maids knew exactly where furniture should stand. Frank was also careful about the state of his house; signs can be seen at Treasurer’s House with careful instructions to the staff. A former kitchen maid told how Frank would inspect the kitchen, turning out any drawers he thought were untidy. Frank Green retired to Somerset in 1930 and gave Treasurer’s House to the National Trust, complete with his vast collection. It was the first historic house acquired by the Trust with its contents complete.

The Treasurers House
The Treasurers House
Wisteria and naked bum statue
Wisteria and naked bum statue

I like how the paintings are incorporated into the fireplaces.

TH-6
artistic fireplace

Frank decorated the rooms to match the collected artworks that he had obtained on his work travels, but this hall was done in faux medieval style.

The medieval room
The medieval room
medieval hall ~ view from the balcony
medieval hall ~ view from the balcony
light and shade
light and shade

Some wonderful artwork in the hall…

TH-2
King Charles and a hoss
TH
copping a feel

This next room was all done out to match the painting of a lady in a blue dress. I think it was my favourite room, loved all the ornate furniture and oriental vases.

Lady in blue
Lady in blue

TH-10

french furniture
french furniture
more french furniture
more french furniture
looking in
looking in
looking back
looking back

This marble topped table had intricately carved wooden legs, but they looked like metal.

table leg
table leg

we went upstairs through another hallway

on the wing
on the wing
stairwell painting
stairwell painting

Frank decorated for the King’s visit, and this is the bed Edward VII slept in, hope they changed the sheets.

The King's Bed
The King’s Bed

more artwork, a portrait of Francis Drake an English antiquary and surgeon, best known as the author of an influential history of York which he entitled Eboracum after the Roman name of the city.

Francis Drake
Francis Drake

Lastly, this is something I read on wiki, made me smile 🙂

“In 1953 local 17-year-old apprentice plumber Harry Martindale, was repairing pipe work in the cellar, the National Trust having decided to remove the coal-fired central heating installed by Green. After about four hours of work at the top of his ladder Martindale became aware of a musical sound, resembling a series of repeated single trumpet-like notes. The sound grew in intensity until, just below his ladder, Martindale reported that said he saw a soldier wearing a plumed helmet emerge from the wall, followed by a cart horse and about nine or ten pairs of Roman Soldiers. He fell, terrified, from his ladder and stumbled into a corner to hide. The soldiers appeared to be armed legionaries, visible only from the knees up, in a marching formation, but were “scruffy”. They were distinctive in three ways: they carried round shields on their left arms, they carried some kind of daggers in scabbards on their right side and they wore green tunics. When they descended to the level of the Roman Road, on which Martindale had stood his ladders, he was able to see that they wore open sandals with leather straps to the knees.

The experience was so frightening for Martindale that he suffered a nervous breakdown for several months and never returned to his job as a plumber. Many years later excavations in the city revealed that the descriptions of the soldiers dress given by Martindale, at first dismissed as anomalous, in fact matched those of local reserve soldiers who took over theRoman Garrison when the regular soldiers began returning to Rome in the fifth century. During the course of his long life Martindale recounted his experience many times, but never changed any of the details and always refused any payment”.

laters gaters

😉

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